The 2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study conducted by Elearning! Media Group via an online survey of learning professionals reveals the current trends and purchase plans for 2018. These findings were tabulated from 441 responses across corporate, government, education and non-profit organizations. The study was conducted industry-wide and includes Elearning! subscribers and community members.

b2b3

Discover Must Have Features, Brand Ownership & Awareness, Buying Process and Roles in 2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study Download Free Report at:  http://bit.ly/2tDfzWH

Published in Trends

The annual Learning! 100 award program honors public and private sector organizations for innovation, collaboration and learning culture that drives performance.  Applications can be submitted at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Learning100

“The Learning! 100 award winners are an elite team of high performers. From small to large enterprises, this award honors those that push the limits of learning and development, to over achieve by exceeding performance expectations,” says Catherine Upton¸ Group Publisher, Elearning! Media Group. “Learning is at the core of their success. Every Learning! 100 winner inspires us with their innovation, passion and performance.”

Previous Learning! 100 honorees include: T-Mobile, Amazon Web Services, American Heart Association, Salesforce, NASCAR, Defense Acquisition University, and Scripps Health to name a few. Application deadline has been extended to April 15th.

Learn More: http://bit.ly/2FjrEon

Published in Latest News

Do you believe in the science of evolution? At Caltech and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we do because we’re witnessing it.

Over the last two years JPL has embarked on an innovative journey of self-discovery with the aim of enhancing the quality and quantity of learning opportunities while significantly enhancing the user experience. The continually evolving approach is referenced in many ways but is often characterized as a shift in the “Learning Ecosystem.” As in nature, evolution constantly changes and relies on innovation; such is the case at JPL. Another similarity exists in that evolution in nature relies on the ability to effect change among the norm. JPL’s learning evolution is also shaped by the ability to influence cultural norms and must successfully navigate barriers to change all the same.

Change management involves difficult and complex processes, and precisely – it is inevitable. To effectively implement change on individual and organizational levels requires a new model for change, new thinking, and a new framework to ensure smooth implementation of the desired change.

WHAT IS A LEARNING ECOSYSTEM?

Rosenberg and Foreman comprehensively describe the learning ecosystems and the interrelation of people, processes, tools and outcomes in their paper titled, “Learning and Performance Ecosystems.As Rosenberg and Foreman point out, “learning ecosystems provide value by enhancing individual and organizational effectiveness by connecting people, and supporting them with a broad range of content, processes, and technologies to drive performance."

The key characteristic of today’s ecosystems remains in their ease of use; technology is transparent to the user and facilitates user interaction and communication. Moreover, an ecosystem provides access to a mentor and allows the learners to apply their newly acquired skills and knowledge in real-time.

JPL’S NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

The continuing mission of JPL is to lead as the U.S. center for robotic expansion of the solar system, earth science, and space-based economy. The JPL human resources (HR) and learning and development (L&D) team serves as the primary JPL organization responsible for satisfying leadership, organization learning, and development as well as technical training needs of over 6000 JPL personnel and 7000 contract affiliates.

Like many technical organizations, JPL faces challenges in managing the transference of deep technical and institutional knowledge while experiencing an unprecedented growth in JPL mainline mission and a drastic shift in its multi-generational workforce. JPL must address the changing learning styles of new and existing individuals and the constant employee expectation of a commercial-like learning experience.

Prior to embarking on its learning renaissance, JPL provided training and employee development utilizing an experience-based apprenticeship model. The legacy model was extremely successful and enabled remarkable achievements in space exploration. While the mentor and experiential model historically served its purpose well, it wasn’t designed for today’s world of exponential information, and technology torrent. While the legacy model may not remain the primary mode of professional development, one cannot discount the result and would be ignorant to discount its role in future training. The reality remains that JPL had a pressing need to transform the training model to a technology-based model that uses technology to develop skills and knowledge that connects communities’ efficiency.

DESTINATION 2025 BEGINS

In 2015, JPL’s Chief Human Resource Officer Cozette Hart formed the “Destination 2025” working group dedicated to exploring and advancing the future of working and learning at JPL. Over the course of the following year, JPL’s business case for modernization of learning was contextualized. The primary areas of learning modernization were identified as:

>>  Modernization of the JPL learning environment; consistently improve on the availability and quality of training while enhancing the learning experience.

>>  How to significantly modernize talent acquisition and management in the most technically advanced place on Earth.

Change awareness was raised among stakeholders through early communication related to JPL’s needs for change in learning technology and its rapidly evolving capabilities. At JPL, the scope of change was full employee development and a new training ecosystem. The change team provided support and resources and set the direction for various efforts to increase value in specified business areas.

To bring resources together, integrate processes, and communicate effectively, goal-oriented change management was designed to guide individuals and organizations at JPL. The desire for change was reinforced through employee engagement and participation with the aim to overcome resistance through a cross- functional sponsorship program.

NEW LEARNING ECOSYSTEM

The proposed learning approach was designed to provide flexibility and support which compliments the capabilities of JPL’s unique workforce. The learners of today expect a digitally rich learning environment, and implementation of new technology enabled a personalized learning experience to JPL employees anytime and anyplace in real-time. The HR team and its laboratory partners prepared to shift and integrate resources by focusing on the new learning ecosystems in terms of the operational support, technology and curriculum. Each pivot area evolution was based on application of advanced technologies and approaches such as:

>>  Use of a learning portal that provides personalization and support of individualized learning styles.

>>  Migrating from formal to informal learning environment resulting in collateralized credit for learning and experiences.

>>  Embracing self-paced learning and personalized learning environment so that learners choose when and where they learn. The classroom of the future was developed virtually, supporting personal exploration and providing an interactive environment in support of continuous lifelong learning.

>>  Development and integration of a robust framework of learning systems, tools and capabilities which remain transparent to the user, thus ensuring a streamlined and positive user experience.

>>  Development of a knowledge capture and transfer system designed to support the transference of critical knowledge and expertise during normal Lab business.

>>  The ability to scale the learning envi- ronment and its offerings commensurate with the increase in project work and competing personal priorities.

>>  Development of digitally rich learning and implementation of in-house and contract augmented learning content production.

>>  Introduction of a wide array of live and virtual training methodologies.

NEW PROCESS, SYSTEM AND STRUCTURE

To support the new concept and change design, new process, system, and structure were deployed. To provide the right training to the right employees at the right time, our team worked on several key activities including the implementation of a new organizational structure, internal processes, pilots of learning technology and overall modernization of the learning framework. Through organizational analysis and input from stakeholder groups, we determined the best approach to enable success within a decentralized organization was with enhanced processes,offerings, and services such as:

>>  Restructuring technical learning, improved design, development and delivery of learning capabilities.

>>  Investment into user experience tooling (i.e. Degreed learning portal).

>>  Streamlined business processes to reduce redundancies (annual call for training).

>>  Virtual classrooms.

>>  Creation of hybrid online/ physical learning cohort utilizing virtual classrooms technology.

NEW TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCES

The new learning environment was based on the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM), and XAPI standards. These standards reflect the current and evolving best practices for developing, sequencing, and packaging learning contents. For learners, the easy access to learning content was made through a common repository and portal. The new portal became the one stop knowledge shop where learners can search, find, and utilize learning objects. Moreover, trainers were able to publish learning content using a multitude of delivery formats (e.g., micro-learning, curated, custom built, instructor-led, case studies, eBooks, wikis, podcasts, video snippets, case studies, etc.)

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IMPERATIVE

Knowledge management is a systematic creation, acquisition, integration, distribution, application, and transference of knowledge used to drive behaviors which support organizational objectives. Knowledge management captures and transfers both existing and newly created information and knowledge.

The JPL process of knowledge management was based on the aggregation of institutional knowledge which can be distributed, shared and accessed by all employees when and where needed to perform assigned tasks, solve problems and engage in innovation.

Embracing knowledge management and becoming a modern learning organization requires a culture change across JPL. To mitigate loss of critical institutional knowledge because of employee retirement, JPL focuses on every employee contributing to the body of knowledge at individual and organization levels. The explicit and implicit knowledge capabilities facilitated resources coordination and enable deployment of state-of-the-art institutions and technical learning. Better communication across the organization improves stakeholders’ understanding of training requirements. Therefore, increased coordination refines the development and execution of training requirements, ultimately creating better contents.

BENEFITS OF NEW SYSTEM

The introduction of a new learning model has shifted the learning environment from a directive inflexible model to one that empowers and provides individualized learning and development capability. In addition to greater flexibility, today’s best practices models reduce the cost to train while increasing the ability to scale resources to meet a larger workforce’s personalized learning needs.

Advanced learning content management approaches introduced new methods of curriculum development and deployment. JPL’s HR L&D piloted enterprise learning content development efforts within their own teams while harnessing the experience and resources of the greater decentralized JPL learning and development workforce. Studies have indicated that new approach can reduce the learning content development time between 25% and 60% while enabling self-paced and individualized learning approaches.

With a mix of live, virtual and constructive education and training, an optimum mix of virtual e-learning environment enables live training and optimizes content delivery. We leverage the use of new technologies to supplement and, where appropriate, replace hands-on training to maximize availability and scaling. However, certain aspects of JPL training cannot be performed virtually due to the high degree of complexity associated with lab-based scientific training.

In the context of growing demand for training resources and the speed at which knowledge is being created and evolving, the learning ecosystem enhances the effectiveness and efficiency of the training and provides flexibility to deal with the ever-increasing velocity of changing procedures, systems, scientific methods and equipment at JPL.

SAVINGS GENERATES INVESTMENT

The technical training organization’s formula to create an effective organization has changed over the years, but the fundamental ingredients include the right organizational structure and processes, technology and infrastructure, and people to develop the best workforce at the lowest cost possible. This approach enables JPL to invest cost savings derived from efficiencies in its training system into the future of scientific and engineering training. JPL experienced major cost savings by contracting many of the training developers and have reinvested back into the training program. The JPL L&D learning plan is comprised of multiple approaches designed to elicit outcomes which create positive results in the areas of individual growth and flexibility, opportunities for experiential learning, and a greater efficiency which allows expansion of learning offerings.

FUTURE CHALLENGES

The new learning ecosystem has and will change the context of how learning takes place. Learners experience real-time and pushed recommendations for learning. The information available is dynamic, technically applicable, visually engaging and easy to locate. In response to the growing training needs, the L&D shift has enabled and empowered self-directed learning.

JPL must sustain easily accessible systems for learners to access information from a myriad of sources. The additive value of the learning organization of tomorrow will be in the identification, validation, and creation of high quality technically accurate learning content. JPL L&D will still be responsible for the production of high quality, engaging learning material. As the need for information and the number of JPL employees expands, L&D must refine its ability to scale its training development and support services.

Training development and support services will take on many forms in the days ahead ranging from exclusively virtual learning environments to live constructive hybrid and instructor-led environments augmented with technology-based presentation and subject matter interactive channels.

CONCLUSIONS

HR and L&D enables and empowers learning. The aim was to develop resources, sustain people, processes using tools and technology to provide individualized training content to the right employees, at the right time using contents of the highest technical quality.

Resulting, JPL workforce maintains a world-class level of technical competencies and on-the-job performance.

>>  The new learning ecosystem ensures individual and organizational competencies for technical workforce while focusing on people.

>>  Greater availability and access to learning opportunities at the existing funding levels.

>>  Reduced cost of training and re-distribution and reinvestment of training dollars.

>>  Reduced time spent with curriculum development and delivery through repository.

>>  Enhanced opportunity for employees to experience advanced simulation and made training technology available both inside and outside the traditional classroom.

>>  Preservation and focused use of instructor-led and hands-on training and less time required to fully develop early career hire employees.

—Anthony Gagliardo is a Learning! Champion award-winner for thought-leadership. His program to re-imagine the learning ecosystem at JPL inspired this honor. Gagliardo is head of HR & Technical Training at NASA’s JPL and is committed to supporting the training needs of those at NASA and Caltech Institute.

Published in Top Stories

Americans are eager to work but no longer for somebody else. The number of Americans working for themselves looks to triple—to 42 million people—by 2020, according to Research Now.

Millennials are driving the freelance trend. Of the 27 million independent workers, 42% will be millennials. The study also finds Americans who already work for themselves are very content to keep doing so, with 97% of them (up from 10%) reporting no desire to return to the traditional workplace. These findings are consistent with Intuit’s 2006 study on the topic.

“Given these trends, companies need to proactively create what I call approved workplace ecosystems that will likely include the corporate campus, home office… or any place with a decent Wi-Fi or 4G signal,” claims Jeremy Neuner, CEO, NextSpace.“A real ecosystem is about more than just a collection of places. It’s about the norms, the culture, and the vibe that knit [us] together,” concludes Neuner.

Source:  https://www.freshbooks.com/_themes/ freshbooks/brand-assets/freshbooks-survey-2017.pdf

Published in Latest News

According to McKinsey Global, 32% of U.S. jobs will be replaced by automation by 2030. This is a small percentage across the global front. McKinsey estimates that 400 million to 800 million people will need new jobs as automation and machine learning creep into industries all over the world. Of that number, McKinsey suggests 375 million will have to switch occupational categories entirely.

b2b.10

“It’s going to take a shift in mindset,” says Susan Lund, a leader of the McKinsey Global Institute. “People need to expect they may not only have entirely different employers, but entirely different occupations. We talk about lifelong learning, but in the next five to 10 years, we’ve actually got to make that a reality—it will require changes from employers and policy-makers, but also individuals, on how we think of jobs.”

Published in Latest News

HR needs to put proper foundations in place first before implementing to AI.

“We’ve gone from the mainframe to DOS to Windows to client- server to web,” says Jason Averbrook, Principal of LeadGen.  In five generations of technology, I’ve been really doing the same things, only on a new piece of technology. This [AI] isn’t that. This is not doing the same thing on a new piece of technology. This is actually changing the way work is done and doing things completely differently.”

HR must step up to the mark with digitization and AI by:

>>  Constructing solid data sets

>>  Creating a great user experience

>>  Shifting focus from automation to digitalization which changes the work experience

“The danger is that HR will be caught napping when the executive team comes knocking and wants to know what HR’s plans are for this new way of working,” concludes Averbrook.Source: https://diginomica.com/2018/02/26/ready-hr-ai/

Published in Latest News

Sixty-nine percent of organizations are using Artificial Intelligence in IT functions today says Infosys study.  While 75% are currently or planning to replace workforce resources with AI technology, 80% of organizations will retrain or redeploy displaced employees.

How Companies Are Preparing Staff

b2b.9

McKinsey & Company claims that AI can automate as much as 45 percent or more of any particular job – allowing workers to focus on higher level, mission-critical activities.

With 76% of senior executives saying AI is fundamental to their organization’s success, AI will only grow in adoption over the next 3 years.

Source: http://infy.com/2CT3CLG

https://www.infosys.com/aimaturity/Documents/amplifying-human-potential-CEO-report.pdf

Published in Latest News

Simply put, learners in teams are more engaged. Research Eesley conducted shows that collaboration in online classes significantly improves learning and engagement and course completion.

According to the study, students who worked in teams were 16 times more likely to pass the course. As a baseline, of the 23,577 students working individually, only 2% (501) passed the course. However, 32% of all students on teams graduated-1500% higher. Of this, 21% of students working in teams without mentors and 44% of students in teams with mentors passed (See Figure 1).

Similarly, students in teams were more engaged in the community and contributed more to class discussions and peer evaluations. For example, students on teams accessed the course five times as often. On average, learners working alone logged in once per week, but students in teams (no mentors) signed in 4.9 times per week, and students in teams with mentors signed in 5.5 times per week (See Figure 2).

COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENTS

The completion rate of individuals working alone resembles that of most free, open courses on traditional learning platforms. It is clear that basic “social features,” such as discussion boards, messaging, and social network sharing, are insufficient to drive higher engagement.

The benefit of social learning comes when students feel responsible as part of a learning community. One can achieve this with a combination of team-based assignments, mentorship, reputation systems, identity transparency, community moderation, and the like. This ‘felt accountability” is a powerful intrinsic motivator that is effective at increasing course persistence and learning outcomes. This type of networking drives significantly higher engagement and completion rates.

CONTEXT AND RESEARCH

This research was conducted at Stanford University from 26,248 students in Technology Entrepreneurship, an eight-week free course. The analysis utilizes a multivariate regression format, with dependent variables of various engagement and satisfaction measures, independent variables including collaboration type, and control variables for demographics, engagement level, etc.

B2B-0

Published in Insights

Automation, Engagement & Technology Challenges Emerge

Learning and Development plays a crucial role to organizations as the future workplace evolves.  A recent study from McKinsey reports that 375 million jobs will be displaced by automation. Last month, an InfoSys study revealed that 75% of organizations will replace workforce resources with Artificial Intelligence (AI). Yet, 80% of these organizations plan to retrain or redeploy displaced workers.

This isn’t the only challenge to organizations and L&D teams worldwide. As millennials dominate the workforce, so do their workplace preferences and learning styles. In a recent Gallup study, 85% of the global workforce is disengaged versus 67% of U.S. workers. Sixty-one percent of respondents cited “work at what they do best” as a top engagement driver. And, 45% of millennials say, “a job that accelerates career development is very important.”  L&D is crucial for building new competencies, identifying strengths, and career development.

NOW IS A GREAT TIME TO BE IN L&D.

CEOs have placed employee engagement as a top organizational priority and are investing in these initiatives. Plus, technology to drive performance and engagement is readily available to organizations of all sizes. In the 2018 Learning and Talent Platforms Buyer Study conducted by Elearning! Magazine,  record investments are reported in platforms that improve engagement and performance, skills development and personalization. While the list of ‘Must Have’ features are long, they align to the business drivers of engagement, personalization, performance and collaboration.

The transition to a new learning ecosystem to support next gen workforce and knowledge transfer is not an easy one. Learning! Champion Anthony Gagliardo of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory shares JPL’s roadmap from traditional learning to a modern learning ecosystem- coined ‘Destination 2025.' 

It’s time for L&D to take their rightful seat at the C-suite table. The success of the business depends upon it. Yet, there is a discipline required to earn that seat. Ronda Feage, Director of Strategy, ChoiceU, Choice Hotels International, (a 2017 Learning! 100 winner), shares the steps to take that seat. It all starts with ‘Yes’.

CONGRATULATIONS TO 2018 LEARNING! CHAMPIONS

Many of L&D’s top performers are being recognized here as 2018 Learning! Champions. They have launched new corporate universities; Developed effective global learning programs; Created award-winning learning programs and content; and, continue to drive our industry forward as key thought-leaders.

Keep on Learning!

– Catherine Upton, Group Publisher

Published in Ideas

Transforming the Learning Organization from Order-Takers to Business Partners

By Ronda Feague

"It's just training, it doesn’t take long to create." How many times have you heard that or something similar?

The challenges facing the learning organization when moving from order-taker to business partner are:

>>  Customers often think it is easy  to create training.

>>  Customers may have a pre-determined solution.

>>  The learning organization is often backed into a corner in terms of  development time.

>>  Due to cost constraints, the learning organization must deliver more  with less.

Our internal customers often don’t realize how long good learning design takes. We feed this myth, by continually jumping through hoops to deliver the learning solution in time to support a new software, product or program release, reinforcing that we are just order-takers and not partners in providing the solution. As learning professionals, we know that well designed learning solutions can add value by improving efficiencies, engaging staff, saving money, providing metrics data and showing Return on Investment (ROI) for the business. It is imperative that we build strong relationships and partner with stakeholders, so they understand the type of value we can bring.

HOW DO YOU GET IN THE  DOOR AND GET TO THE TABLE?

To start, you must assess your team’s capabilities, your larger learning team goals and combine that with a deep understanding of your company’s organizational goals and the operational realities of the business. Do you have a defined vision (what you provide) and mission (how you’ll provide it)? If not, you need to spend some time reflecting and building out what that is and making sure your team is onboard. You can’t expect anyone to follow your lead if you don’t know where you are going.

While a strong learning design background and understanding of the business is important it is equally important to build relationships.  According to Peter Block: “The building of authentic relationship as the delivery system for expertise and business knowledge. The result is to make internal clients trusted business partners which results in improved business outcomes for companies and organizations." Building on that philosophy, find your champions and cultivate those relationships. Once you have found them, ask if they see areas where the learning organization can be included.

IDENTIFY PROJECT OBJECTIVES

You’ve been invited to the table, now what? When you meet with stakeholders initially, listen first and then ask questions to help: narrow focus, get the project team on the same page and help you decide which learning solutions, if any, to recommend. Then share how learning can help them achieve their goal. Some questions to ask are:

>>  Who are we impacting (target audience)?

>>  What problem is being solved?

>>  What will success look/feel like (metrics)?

The answers will help you to narrow recommendations and decide if learning is the solution.  Sometimes as you meet with the stakeholder and they answer questions, you may realize that the solution is simpler, maybe a communication or a conversation is all that is needed not a full-blown learning solution.

Tip: Use stakeholders time wisely. Some stakeholders may want to be more actively involved in the process than others. Be proactive; ask them how they would like to be communicated with and how often.

Bonus Tip: Begin with ‘yes.’ Yes can be disarming (assuming it is the truth) that you could build what they are requesting (take their order). But, once you know what they want to accomplish, that may drive the design and you are on your way to ‘partnership.

DESIGN PROPOSAL

Once you have completed analysis, go back to the business with your recommendations for learning solutions. As you put the design proposal together tie in your recommendations to the answers that the stakeholder’s provided and use their language.  Provide reasoning as to why the recommendations landed where they did. Be sure to note how you will track success and when results will be reported back to the business.

For example, we were asked to create a half day in person instructor-led training for a new phone system being installed in five countries over the course of two months.  To save money and time we recommended short, engaging e-lessons to introduce the new system followed by a virtual session with an instructor where learners could ask questions.

Tip: Don’t over engineer solutions.

STATEMENT OF WORK

Once the design proposal is accepted, we follow up with a Statement of Work (SOW). This document has been key in our success, second only to building relationships. This will become the roadmap for the project with the business and should include:

>>  What learning solution will be delivered.

>>  Expectations of the stakeholder and subject matter experts during the feedback cycle.

>>  List any critical items from the stakeholder and promised deliverable dates from them.

>>  Signature lines for stakeholder and learning solution provider.

How many times have you begun work on a project, sent for feedback and the stakeholder wants to add additional items that were not part of the original conversation?  The SOW helps with scope creep. If the business doesn’t provide critical information or feedback as agreed to, you can pull it back out and remind your business partner where you landed prior to starting the project.

Tip: We stopped giving delivery dates and moved to hours for all projects. People latch on to dates and remember them.  They forget when the software development cycle ran late or critical items needed for learning solution design were not delivered on time.

DEMONSTRATE IMPACT

Remember you need to report results back to the business. By building in tracking during the design phase you can track that data at set times and share with the business.  This is where your credibility is built.  Cool, flashy design will only take you so far. You can have cool, flashy plus impact or lower key design with impact, but you cannot under any circumstances have any type of design with negative outcomes or impact.  Sometimes projects miss the mark, better to course correct as soon as a you know the solution is not hitting the mark. Sometimes it can just be a small tweak to set the solution on the right course again. When a solution misses the mark, own it.  Reach out to the business and deliver this information and offer solutions.

Tip: If the learning solution is not making a difference, stop and/or readjust.

PITFALLS

This sounds great on paper, but the reality is that it isn’t easy. You can’t chase fads or make a project fit a tool that you want to try out.  Credibility is at stake, make sure that the solution and tool for delivery match, the solution fits the target and that the learning will make an impact.  Look for innovative solutions and don’t over-engineer.

When approached about a project, it is easy to fall back into the order-taker mentality because it is familiar.  Take a step back, ask the questions and provide thought leadership to arrive at the right solutions.

Keep your eye on your target audience and put yourself into the “shoes of the learner”.  Would you want to use the solution?  Would it engage you, provide you needed information, or is it just checking a box? If you aren’t moving the needle, then why do it?

CONCLUSION

Becoming a trusted business advisor takes time and effort. You must build and maintain relationships. You must also understand the business and how learning can help. Results should take the form of speed, quality, operational efficiency, cost savings, culture/engagement and other performance related outcomes.

As you start experiencing wins with this process, start sharing those with your team and across the organization.  The best feeling is for teams to reach out to the learning organization, not because they have a training need, but because they want to bounce ideas to get your thoughts prior to them moving forward with a project.  This seat at the table feels good.

It took 12 months for us to get to this point, and we continue to hone our story and approach, relationships and outcomes, provide thought leadership and continue to help our stakeholders to start in the “What do they need to know” mode and not jumping to “solution” mode.

Order taking will never go away and, for certain instances, it still makes sense. But for the larger asks, put a process in place. Ask: “What problem are we solving?” “Are the results measurable?” and “Is this the right solution?” The process creates a circle of learning and performance. Success breeds trust, credibility, the ability to make a difference with learners and the business, ensure learning is an active partner of future initiatives.

Celebrate your successes internally with your team.  Apply for industry awards and, as you accept industry acknowledgement, share that internally.  Your team is now viewed as a value add. Not just because you said so, but because others see it too. And remember that the purpose for learning in the context of organizations is to add value to the business.

--Ronda Feague is Director of Instructional Design Strategy & ChoiceU Operations, at Choice Hotels International. Choice Hotels International is a 2017 Learning! 100 award-winner for culture.

Published in Top Stories
Page 3 of 38

 


You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials