Josh Bersin, principle, Bersin by Deloitte revealed 10 disruptions that will transform the HR technology field. They are:

New focus on tools for workforce productivity like mobile and social

ERP and HCM move to the cloud as the talent market reinvents itself as “team management”

Continuous performance management has arrived following talent from project to project, data driven and in real-time.

Explosion of feedback, pulse survey & analytics tools going beyond employee performance to well being

Reinvention of corporate learning is here to keep pace with new technologies, A.I., machine learning and the like

Recruiting market is rapidly changing and focused on smart recruiting

Well being market is exploding to focus on the whole person vs solely on productivity

People analytics market has grown and matured with embedded analytics, A.I. and organizational network analytics

Intelligent self-service, communications and employee experience tools to facilitate decision-making

10 HR departments are becoming digital and innovative,  team-centric and intelligent

Published in Trends

Global corporate e-learning market is set to grow at a CAGR of close to 19% during the forecast period, 2017-2021 according to Technavio. The Americas currently account for $15.59 billion in revenues or 41% market share. EMEA represents 32.7% share and is expected to reach $30.82 billion by 2021. APAC regions is 26.3% share and will see 20% CAGR.

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“The market is expected to witness rapid growth during the forecast period owing to the increase in digitization and corporate realization of the importance of training in strengthening the workforce. In addition, e-learning helps companies overcome the obstacles that may arise from traditional learning formats,” says Jhansi Mary, research leader, Technavio.

Published in Trends

The 2017/2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study conducted by Elearning! Media Group via an online survey of learning professionals reveals the current trends and purchase plans for 2018. These findings were tabulated from approximately 300 responses across corporate, government, education and non-profit organizations. The study was conducted industry wide and includes Elearning! subscribers and community members.

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Discover Must Have Features, Brand Ownership & Awareness, Buying Process and Roles in 2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study Full Report Available February 2018 at 2elearning.com.

Published in Trends

Learning Ovations, Digital Promise, UCI, and MDRC were awarded U.S. Department of Education EIR Grants to scale personalized literacy instruction for United2Read Project. The five-year expansion grant aims to have 90% or more of students reading at grade level by third grade, and to improve district, school, and teacher capacity.

Published in Latest News

The CEO of Mastercard told an audience in Saudi Arabia that “data could be as effective as oil as a means of generating wealth.” Is he right?

“Companies today handle more data than ever before and it’s having a profound effect on the way governments, businesses and technologies evolve,” says data scientist Justhy Deva Prasad, author of “The Billion Dollar Byte: Turn Big Data into Good Profits, The Datapreneur Way.

Non-digital companies may be doomed. “You cannot halt the digital revolution and if companies don’t build a boat that embraces the coming data tsunami, they’re not going to be able to compete with those who do,” says Prasad.

Traditional legacy companies need a framework for making data strategy central to their business models in the same way that the newer Digital Native companies have. The framework should provide concrete models for creating smart data infrastructures, accurately weighing the value of data and data systems, investing in the right technologies, hiring entrepreneurial people with tech skills, leveraging the full value of data, and much more. It aims to help companies align their data strategy with their business model.

Published in Latest News

According to an Informa study, 22 percent of channel professionals said their gross annual salaries increased due to new skills development or new certifications. This, in a time where most professionals are seeing stagnant or negative earnings growth.

“In this age of digital transformation and burgeoning new technology models like artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things and containers, it’s no wonder that training and career development also played a big role in salary increases in 2017,” Informa says.

Training in Cloud computing led the way, with 37 percent of channel professionals saying they had participated in training related to the Cloud in the past 12 months. Other hot skills include business intelligence, machine learning, artificial intelligence, data analytics, security, and automation.

Published in Latest News

The buzz was all about artificial intelligence (A.I.) at this year’s HR Technology Conference. No surprise, as the size of the global market for artificial intelligence for enterprise applications is worth around $360 million according to statistics.

A.I. HR implementations are seen in talent, recruitment and succession planning.  IBM Talent showcased some applications.  Several other companies displayed Alexa-customized solutions like Paradox, which is a branded A.I. coach. It claims to “build human-powered A.I. to engage, empower and understand large groups of people.” Oracle will be infusing its Cloud applications with artificial intelligence. “A.I. should be an enabler,” says Gretchen Alarcon of Oracle.

Published in Latest News

Learners in today’s workforce don’t want to be taught to, but expect to be able to learn. Millennials especially cite learning as the most desirable benefit a job can offer. They expect learning opportunities to be personal, accessible and flexible. That’s the heart of modern professional learning.

To be able compete in the war for workplace talent, organizations need to personalize the professional learning experience and empower employees to lead their own learning.

“It’s not just about the pay as it is about the whole experience of working for a business,” says Shane Sutherland, founder and chief designer at portfolio and personal learning platform company PebblePad, a D2L partner.

HOW TO PERSONALIZE LEARNING

There are four ways organizations can personalize professional learning.

1. CREATE PERSONALIZED LEARNING PATHWAYS

Enabling employees to create and keep online learning portfolios is a great way for organizations to pave personalized learning pathways. Online portfolios are a space where employees can build up evidence of their learning, reflect on their experiences, and share those reflections if they wish. In that way, they can make employees active actors in their own learning.

They can be transferable from job to job, so employees can tell the story of who they are, what they’ve learned, and the skills they’ve developed — a key consideration in the quickly growing gig economy.

Portfolios can be particularly effective when embedded into well-thought-out learning designs via an online learner engagement platform that presents learning to employees in specific contexts. Modern learning platforms can provide employees with easy access to their portfolios and other learning materials as needed — things like “just-in-time” social, mobile and video learning content, or content that they can access at their own pace after completing certain tasks or reaching different milestones.

2. PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOCIAL LEARNING

Conversation can be a crucial driver of personalized employee learning. Coaches, mentors and peers can all help employees to extract insights out of a learning experience, which can be something as simple as a discussion by the office coffee machine.

According to an October 2015 survey by the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies, 88 percent of people believe knowledge sharing within a team is essential for workplace learning. Group research projects are a great tool in that regard— they empower people to seek out new knowledge, make sense of it, and share what they learn with their peers.

Manager-led learning, where managers act more like a coach or mentor and give people opportunities to learn through things like projects, can also drive social learning. Creating custom templates can give managers a framework for facilitating effective conversations around projects and performance: What 10 words would you use to describe your performance? What did you find most challenging? What do you feel you achieved?

3MAKE LEARNING MOBILE, AVAILABLE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE

Workplace learners expect to be able to access learning experiences anywhere, at any time, and on multiple devices.

According to Google, when it comes to search, 80 percent use a smartphone and 57 percent use more than one type of device. Gartner says that consumers will own and use three to four devices by 2018. And according to a study by Global Workplace Analytics, 80 percent to 90 percent of people in the U.S. workforce say they would like to telework at least part time, and Fortune 1000 companies around the globe are entirely revamping their space around the fact that employees are already mobile. That’s why it’s become increasingly incumbent on organizations to enable mobile learning.

4. ENCOURAGE EMPLOYEES TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR OWN LEARNING

Empowering employees to learn outside the office is a great way to get them to take ownership of their own learning. They can learn a lot through online sharing with their own professional and social networks, and independently researching on the Internet — be it through Google, YouTube videos, or LinkedIn.

There are also many learning opportunities available out in the real world, too. Professional events, volunteering, hobbies and personal interests, and community engagement are also great opportunities for professional learning and development.

At the end of the day, personalizing employee learning is about more than simply modernizing learning and development. It’s also about providing learning that’s beyond the bounds of the work they must do.

—Jon Paul is Content Manager for D2L.

Published in Ideas

WHAT, EXACTLY, ARE COMPETENCIES?

Competencies are abilities, behaviors, knowledge and skills that impact the success of employees and organizations. They can include general skills (like communication skills), role-specific skills, leadership skills and others. The common theme is that a competency can be analyzed and broken down into a set of specific behaviors that tell employees what is expected of them and that management can measure.

The idea is that these competencies should be well-defined across the organization. The definition is not enough by itself, however. It needs to be paired with specific behaviors or tasks that are expected of the employee. These will be different depending on the role of the employee in question Once competencies are defined, you can create a competency model: a set of 7 to 10 core competencies that are aligned with your company’s business goals.

Once you have a model, you can begin defining tasks for each competency for given roles. You can then use them to assess potential employees for different positions. You can also easily and consistently communicate your expectations, as well as measure competencies as part of your performance reviews. Finally, you can grow your training opportunities for employees to improve upon the competencies.

WHY INCORPORATE COMPETENCIES?

Competency modeling is now a mainstay in the most successful businesses. In one study by Development Dimensions International (DDI), 89 percent of best-in-class organizations had core competencies defined for all their roles, compared to a mere 48 percent for all other companies.

A separate report, the Top Companies for Leaders report done in conjunction with Fortune and Aon Hewitt, found that a full 100 percent of companies making the global top companies list use a well-defined competency model.

There’s ample evidence that using competencies does help businesses. For example, companies that manage their people well with regard to skills, knowledge, commitment and abilities are 30 percent to 40 percent more productive than average. The issue isn’t whether the model works. The issue is how to get started using the model.

FIRST STEPS

Here are six steps for getting started with competencies:

1. Start small.

Don’t re-invent the wheel. Work to identify just a handful of competencies — no more than five or six — for your organization. Once you’ve incorporated a select few and shown success, then you can build on these.

2. Decide on consistent terminology to be used.

This includes the names and definitions of the competencies themselves. To make them memorable, you can use the first letter of the names of each competency to spell out a word, like GROW or STEAM.

3. Think in terms of specific, concrete tasks.

Think about the tasks or behaviors that demonstrate the competencies you have chosen. Also think about tasks and behaviors that fail to demonstrate them so you can incorporate into your performance review process.

4. Work your new terminology into job descriptions, and use it when advertising positions. 

When it comes to describing job positions or roles, and when looking for people to fill those roles, use the language you adopted when talking about your competencies.

5. Research how competencies can be measured in your assessments.

Both assessment questionnaires and 360 surveys can be tuned to uncover evidence of competencies in your employees.

6. Craft training around those competencies.

Find content (or a training partner like ej4) that speaks to your competencies, and create courses that can help both your leaders and your front-line employees grow in those areas.

Use of competency learning tracks in the learning management system, like Thinkzoom by ej4, is just one way to incorporate competencies into their learning. Ready to get started? Visit us online at ej4.com.

Published in Ideas

With so many things to incorporate into your training program, how do you know where to focus your efforts? A successful program requires many factors working together, but it all starts with a program manager dedicated to impacting business results and employees’ development. We work with those training champions every day, and through our partnerships with them, we’ve identified nine key areas to focus on for building highly successful employee training programs.

STRONG PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Titles of training program managers may vary, but they all share a commitment to continually develop and improve their programs. Ideal program managers are curious, openminded, motivated, and interested in helping others develop their skills.

ASSESSING TRAINING NEEDS

Performing a needs assessment through internal surveys, interviews and research will help determine who needs to be trained and on what skills. Understanding these training needs forms the foundation of what makes your training program integral to the company’s successes.

ALIGNMENT WITH BUSINESS INITIATIVES

To see the strongest results from training, look at how training needs you’ve identified are tied into organizational initiatives. Help employees and leaders see how training and development contributes to the goals of the overall company goals.

4 CREATING GOALS  AND METRICS

When training and business needs are aligned, create goals that show the steps for how to achieve those results. Make sure these goals are achievable in a reasonable amount of time, and that they’re specific to the outcomes desired.

5 LEADERSHIP BUY-IN

Your leadership team’s support of the program is critical to seeing success. Once you’ve identified the needs, aligned them to organizational initiatives, and created strong goals, you can show senior leaders the impact of training on the bottom line. This opens all sorts of doors for a bigger budget, higher utilization and engagement, and the ability to build a learning culture in your company.

6 RELEVANCY OF CONTENT

The training content you provide to learners must be relevant for them to be engaged and really learn from it. Curating content for specific needs allows them to find information quicker and view your program as a valuable source for personal and professional development.

7  INFUSING CREATIVITY

Inviting creative ideas into your program helps grow engagement and a more positive attitude toward training. Collaborating and brainstorming fun ideas delights employees with training that is enjoyable and helps them get hooked on developing their skills.

8 ONGOING MARKETING

This is an area where many program managers struggle to maintain momentum. A successful marketing plan encapsulates initial launch activities, along with strong ongoing efforts throughout the program. Training communication sent to employees should always include the “why” and what’s in it for them. The goal of marketing is to increase utilization and engagement, so to do that, you’ll need to continually show employees how they’ll benefit from the available training.

9. POST-TRAINING REINFORCEMENT

Training is only effective if it’s remembered, so counteracting the brain’s natural forgetfulness is a critical part of seeing results from your training program, since 70 percent of training is forgotten within 24 hours. Providing opportunities for learners to recall what they were trained will help them commit it to long-term memory. Send follow-up questions and provide a space for discussions in order to see positive and impactful results from your training program.

—As a content marketing specialist with BizLibrary, the author researches and writes relevant and helpful content for the HR and L&D community. She manages blog posts, press releases, social media, and creates resources that educate and motivate the BizLibrary audience to take action and improve employee training in their organizations. Contact Brubaker at (636) 205-0354 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  .

Published in Ideas
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