Augmented reality, mobile and collaborative solutions top the list of fastest growing learning technologies learning leaders plan to deploy according to the 2018 Learning & TalentPlatforms Study conducted by Elearning! Magazine.

Fastest 1

Published in Trends

Open AR Community Launched

The global AR market is projected to reach $209.2 billion by 2022 according to Statista. As augmented reality apps and hardware continue to evolve, they still largely deliver solitary experiences that exist in isolation. Now a new industry group plans to develop an AR cloud in the hopes of linking all of these games and services into a shared platform that creates a singular augmented view of the entire world. The Open AR Cloud Organization was unveiled at the Augmented World Expo EU in Munich Join the community at: https://www.openarcloud.org/

Source: https://www.statista.com/statistics/591181/global-augmented-virtual-reality-market-size/

 

Published in Latest News

The Fosway 9-Grids assists HR leaders in making informed decisions around their solution choices. It compares solutions based on their Performance, Potential, Market Presence, Total Cost of Ownership and Future Trajectory. Workday and Cornerstone also named 2018 Best of Elearning! honorees.

Fosway Ranks HCM Cloud SolutionsFosway Ranks HCM Cloud Solutions2

Published in Latest News

In 2004, UC Berkeley had 300 data science graduates. This semester, the number of students spiked to 1,000 causing the university to add the new undergraduate degree to the School of Science and Letters. The degree is the first to be added in 16 years.

"No program has grown this fast at Berkeley," said David Culler, interim dean of the Division of Data Sciences, which was established in December.

Other UC campuses are scrambling to add the data courses to meet demands. UC San Diego, Santa Cruz and Davis have expanded programs. UC Irvine was the first to offer a data science degree in 2014.

Demand

Published in Latest News

Linking process improvements to business strategy is the top challenge for senior leaders in the year ahead according to PEX 2018 Report. Sustaining change (30%), ensuring customer focus (22%), overcoming short term focus (22%), and deploying new technologies (21%) round out the top 5 challenges. Skill shortage (10%), lack of alignment between business and departments (12%) and maintaining executive buy-in (16%) completed the list of concerns. To view complete report, 

Visit: https://register.processexcellencenetwork.com/pex-annualreport-2018-email-only/
Source: PEX 2018 Report 

Top Business

Published in Latest News

It’s been 14 years since the birth of the Best of Elearning! Awards. The first edition in 2005 featured 9 categories, 29 brands receiving 245 nominations. The 2005 class included GeoLearning, Centra, WebEx, Books 24x7, and Adobe. Many of these brands still reign under different owners. Yet, they represented the need for SaaS or Cloud systems, learner-directed online learning, and effective e-learning development tools. A lot has changed….yet much has stayed the same. In 2005, 49% of learning professionals reported they had referred an e-learning brand to a peer. In 2018, that figure is 85%. Professionals still look to trusted resources for information. The Best of Elearning! Awards were launched in 2005 to formalize this recommendation process through its online user’s choice awards format.

In 2018, the Best of Elearning! Awards recognized 73 brands across 23 categories with thousands of nominations counted. This year 20% of the brands are new to the awards program — continuing to inspire us with constant innovation. We welcome Strivr VR, Sumarian, Modest Tree, Brainier, and other first time honorees to the Best of Elearning! family.

We are entering an exciting time in the learning technology industry. We see Artificial Intelligence powered knowledge and data systems. Machine Learning enabling professionals to focus on strategic actions versus rote activities. Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality are entering the mainstream with Healthcare and Entertainment applications leading the way.

The heavy lifting in learning technology still lies at the feet of the stalwart brands that continue to innovate, evolve and inspire talent. These brands include Adobe, SumTotal Systems, a Skillsoft Company, Cisco WebEx, and Articulate who have earned honors every year since 2005.

We can’t forget the editors who have brought you these 14 years of innovation. John Watson, Jack Gordon and Jerry Roche have brought Elearning! Magazine to life — Earning 24 editorial, design, website and eNewsletter honors for excellence from the Western Publishing Association.

Thank you to you all who have voted for the Best of Elearning! this year or in the past. Thank you to the technologists and solution providers who innovate and inspire. And, a big thank you to John, Jack and Jerry for making it all happen.

Published in Insights

Learning leaders are continually challenged to meet the changing needs of their internal learners and business partners. There’s a constant need to evaluate and balance learner needs and prioritizing learning and development programs that drive meaningful business results. With unemployment at a 30-year low, many organizations are struggling with attracting and retaining talent. Immediately and in the many years to come, Chief Learning and Talent Officers will need to shift their focus on cultivating talent internally to developing and executing on strategies externally.

While many organizations may have strategies and resources dedicated to college campus or trade school recruitment, a new focus of developing a talent pipeline through high school relationships and apprenticeships is essential. There is value in exposing high school students to career pathing and/or apprenticeship programs early-on as there is a potential to combine work-based, on-the-job learning with relevant technical education in the classroom. Students who participate in these programs may graduate with a high school diploma, real work experience, and in some cases, earn college credits, and industry credentials. They also start on a career path that continues after high school graduation – whether that is a continuation of their employment, along with college, college only, apprenticeship only, or other full-time employment.

LEADING WITH STRENGTH
Vi invests heavily in talent development with the goal of leveraging Vi’s commitment to a learning as part of the company’s value proposition to attract and retain talent. In fact, many of Vi’s leaders joined the company in high school and have taken advantage of the company’s front-line Management Development Program, tuition reimbursement program, and certification programs to pursue careers in hospitality, nursing or general management. Nonetheless, with the growing challenges of hiring hospitality and healthcare talent, Vi has shifted efforts and strategies to cultivate interest in health care and hospitality careers with high school students leveraging and refining Vi’s strengths in learning and organizational development.

Leaders view

WHY WAS THIS SHIFT NECESSARY?
As the population in the United States ages, the senior living industry will add nearly 350,000 jobs by 2025 and senior living employment will exceed 1.1 million according to Argentum, the nation’s largest senior living industry association. To meet these needs, Argentum states that the senior living industry will need to recruit 1.2 million new employees by 2025. And this is just one segment of the healthcare industry. According to the Work Institute, the healthcare industry employs over 12% of the U.S. workforce ratio of health-care job openings to available health-care workers of 2 to 1. Additionally, Vi competes heavily for culinary and dining services professionals to serve Vi’s residents. And, with 14 million U.S. restaurant workers, there’s simply not enough applicants to fill jobs.

STRATEGIES LEVERAGED
Working with Vi’s culinary and nursing teams, Vi developed career ladders for culinary and entrylevel nursing positions. Vi’scareer ladder allows existing employees to drive their own career path by achieving specific skills through company-sponsored training programs and mentoring. An employee’s ability to progress through the career ladder is not limited to an open position — rather achievement of defined and demonstrated skills by role. Vi’s career ladder alongside the company’s Management Development Program and tuition reimbursement program provides Vi the value proposition necessary to be potentially be relevant to high school students.

Towards cultivating high school talent, Vi has created a specific career page and recruitment materials to not only paint a clear picture of career paths at Vi, but to also spark interest in meaningful work of making a difference in the lives of older adults.  Vi intends to expand community outreach to high schools and continue pursuit of apprenticeship programs.

IMPORTANCE OF PARTNERSHIPS – NOT ALONE
With the growing labor shortages, Chief Learning and Talent Officers do not need to tackle these challenges alone — leverage professional organizations and associations.

Vi joined Argentum’s recently launched “Senior Living Works” along with other senior living organizations. Senior Living Works is designed to support recruitment, retention, and training needed across the senior living industry — also known as “Careers in Caring.”  “Senior Living Works” initial launch included a website and a Recruitment Engagement Toolkit, with a range of resources to support connections with high schools,technical schools, community colleges, and universities.https://seniorliving.works/

Talent leaders should also consider organizations such as the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), a 501(c)3 non-profit organization with more than 40 years of experience in workforce learning, including 30 years of experience working directly with employers of all sizes across multiple industries to create and deliver effective talent management strategies. From developing best-in-class career pathing software, to creating career and education advising programs for employees, to targeted consulting, CAEL works with leading companies across all industries to help them maximize their investments in learning and talent management for their entire talent pipeline. CAEL has worked directly with employers to plan and deliver innovative and impactful learning and talent management strategies that target all employees -- including the frontline and mid-level workforce. Companies use CAEL’s services to recruit, retain and engage their employees, and ultimately benefit from a pipeline of “right-fit” workers prepared to support their growth strategies. https://www.cael.org/

COLLABORATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
We’re at the intersection of talent acquisition and talent development. While many learning leaders have developed leading learning solutions to increase productivity, sales, decrease expenses, accidents, improve quality, and/or develop leaders, it’s clear the labor shortage isn’t going away anytime soon. Collaboration between an organization’s chief Talent Acquisition and learning leaders alongside their business partners is now more important than ever to cultivate and develop talent.

Published in Insights

If there's one trend that has gripped business headlines this year and put HR squarely in the spotlight, it has been the growing concern over compliance issues, particularly safety, diversity/inclusion, and workplace harassment.

Slowly, decision-makers are understanding that compliance training can't be limited to a oncea-year training session and be successful. They are coming to understand that a safe environment is needed, along with training, and that there are many ways in which we can do better. They’re beginning to realize that they need to put the "human" back in "Human Resources."

HR GETS IT
This will not be news to many of the clients we work with on a weekly basis. Many of ej4’s client contacts are in HR, and we’ve found that HR professionals get it. They truly do care about their people and are always frustrated when their efforts at creating a better environment are not fully supported.

WHAT’S CHANGED?
What has changed is that it’s now obvious that the status quo isn’t enough. In the past, our sales reps noticed that most organizations wanted to spend “the bare minimum” on compliance training. The idea was to hedge against legal risk—and that’s all. If an annual training with a set of antique videos fit the bill, that would be enough for most companies.

SIMPLY “BEING IN COMPLIANCE” IS NOT ENOUGH
It should be obvious why this is not enough. Most compliance training focuses on clarifying the law, and corporate policies with regard to the law. Laws about workplace harassment, discrimination, and safety represent the bare minimum of what companies should be doing to create safe, productive environments. That’s because these laws are designed around what is measurable and enforceable by government agencies. When training focuses solely on being in compliance with the law, it will likewise have minimal effect.

LET’S GET BEYOND THE LEGAL
Imagine what would happen if we paused and thought about compliance in more than just legal terms. Think of your employees as people. People with hopes and dreams. People with families and friends. Imagine if they were a part of your family. Would you want your daughter working at your place of business? Or your neighbor?

When we start thinking in human terms instead of just legal or economic terms, compliance takes on a whole new meaning. It becomes less about liability and more about atmosphere. It doesn’t just stick employees in front of a video for an hour (or a live lecture, for that matter). It seeks to engage, discuss, and follow up.

STILL A BUSINESS DECISION...OF SORTS
Revamping your compliance training is largely a business decision, and there has to be a business case for it. I’m not asking folks to ignore the bottom line. (I’m the CEO of my company. I get it.) My point is that, when we think of everything in economic terms, including people, that’s when problems start.

If you still want to see that business case, I recommend downloading our whitepaper from our website, “Why Compliance Training is More Than a Checkbox.” It has some sobering stats about workplace compliance issues.
For example:
>> Workplace bullying costs U.S. businesses close to $360 billion annually.
>> 48% of employees who experience bullying, as victim or bystander, end up leaving their companies.

Alongside those statistics, this whitepaper provides actionable advice for organizations to do better when it comes to comprehensive compliance training efforts. We all know it needs to happen. We all know that we can do better. Companies will be better for it. Learn more about our training content at www.ej4.com/HR

Published in Insights

Insights and Practical Guidance from the Field

A little more than 30 years ago—at the time when the first micro-computers arrived in the workplace—my career began in learning and development (L&D). It was very exciting to experience the first generation of computer-based training solutions and even the computer-based "management games" that were introduced for leadership development. In those days, the L&D function was called "training," and most efforts were mandated for the workforce and focused on technical skills and training initiatives.

Almost all training was delivered in a classroom or conference center, and research on people-capa-bility building and corporate training was at a preliminary stage. Fast-forward to today. We are at the beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is fueled by advancements in technologies, such as the Internet of Things, machine learning, robots, the autonomous car, 3-D printing, and the mobile Internet, to name a few. All these technologies have already had tremendous impact on what is required of people capabilities in organizations. The world and the workplace have changed dramatically. The good old personal computer has been replaced by the smartphone. It seems like the Internet
has always been around: people work virtually from a variety of locations, technology has introduced and disrupted many business models, and IT has gained dominance over the way we work.

Today, training has evolved into L&D. Organizations that want to stay in business have realized they must continually invest in the development of their human capital, and about 45 percent of all today’s formal learning is delivered through digital solutions. In many cases, these channels have replaced traditional classroom programs. Technology enables learning to be even more personalized and self-directed. The classroom of the 21st century is enabled by technology and provides people with immersive-learning experiences. The future is about high-tech and high-touch learning. Young professionals and leaders have told us that they benefit tremendously from time away from daily work, where they can collaboratively solve wicked problems, practice new skills, receive coaching, connect and learn from others, get inspired by new insights, and reflect on their own work and personal development. Additionally, individuals have realized that they need to embrace lifelong learning mind-sets to remain relevant and that their careers will involve multiple employers and roles.

Research in multiple fields has contributed significantly to the L&D profession. Thanks to cognitive neuroscience we know more about how the brain works and how people learn. This research has provided evidence that because of the brain’s neuroplasticity, people can continue to learn and grow throughout their lifetime. Many universities have performed ground-breaking research in the broader field of adult learning, and L&D professionals benefit tremendously from these insights on how to design the most effective and efficient learning solutions. We also have a better understanding from developmental psychology research on what it takes to change people's behaviors. Finally, the very promising field of positive psychology looks at what enables organizations and people to flourish, and these insights have been incorporated into the design of learning programs.

The defining attributes of the 21st-century economy and fourth industrial revolution are innovation, technology, globalization, and a rapid pace of change. Therefore, an organization’s capacity to enhance the capabilities of its workforce and create a culture of continuous learning are vital to remaining competitive. These trends make an effective learning-and-development (L&D) function more critical than ever. I am the editor and co-author of this book, a compendium of 20 chapters co-authored by McKinsey L&D experts and colleagues. It addresses a range of topics essential to the future of L&D, including function structure and governance, digital learning, and developing lifelong learning mind-sets, among others.

I am very gratified that over the past 30 years L&D has also matured as a profession. There are now several bachelor's, master's, and doctorate university degrees offered in this field, and a growing number of companies have acknowledged that L&D is a vital profession, akin to accounting, IT, and marketing. In these organizations, the role of a chief learning officer has become accepted, and the people appointed to lead L&D are specialists in this broad field of knowledge and expertise.

It has been an amazing personal journey to watch the L&D profession make such an impact over the years. As I am passionate about how I can advance the profession, I reached out to my colleagues and invited them to co-author this book, Elevating Learning & Development: Insights and Practical Guidance. It focuses on a variety of learning topics that matter to every L&D professional. The book includes an introduction and 19 chapters with terrific perspectives from leading McKinsey L&D practitioners and thought leaders. This compendium of articles discusses every facet of professional development and training— from ensuring that L&D's efforts are closely aligned with business strategy to elements of advancing the L&D function, designing learning solutions, deploying digital learning, executing flawlessly, measuring impact, and ensuring good governance. I couldn’t be prouder or more appreciative of all the amazing work that this team has accomplished, and I am delighted to present this book to you. For L&D professionals seeking to hone their organization's efforts, Elevating Learning & Development: Insights and Practical Guidance from the Field is the ideal resource and I hope that you and your colleagues will benefit.

All royalties from this book will be donated to the foundation: (http://www.e-learningforkids.org/) which has provided over 20 million children (age 5-12) with free access to digital learning (online/offline) in elementary school subjects including Math, Science, Language Arts, Computers, Life and Health Skills.

On behalf of the E-learning for Kids Foundation, I want to thank you for purchasing this book. 

Published in Insights

What is the best way to remember a person’s name? Many people suggest that when you are introduced to a new person, you should say that person’s name right away. It sill help you remember the person’s name. This way you use it or lose it.

The brain is built to retain information when it is used. Just like using a person’s name will help you remember it, if you use the training information right away – within hours of learning it, your brain will remember it. This is Learning Application.

Currently, learners look at a training, whether it be an instructor led workshop or an e-learning course, as an event that takes place in a conference room or on their laptop and that is where it stays – in the conference room or the laptop rather than applied on the job. Afterwards, they go back to work, and it is "business as usual".

How about if we look at learning events differently? How about if we focus learning events on "on-the-job application and on-the-job development".

Learning Application focuses on applying the learning directly following the learning event. To do this, we need to set the expectation with learners that after they complete the learning event, they apply the course on the job. Give the learner an exercise to do directly following the training. Make it easy to do with step-bystep instructions, and
a job aid will help them remember it and engrain the new behavior. This is Learning Application.

If you provide your learners with an on-the-job exercise implementing Learning Application, you are asking your learners to Use It - Don’t Lose It!

Use it Dont loose it

Published in Ideas
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