Virtual Reality (V.R.) has been slower to catch on in the U.S. despite the huge investments made by Google and Facebook. It is projected that 22.4 million people in the U.S. will engage with a form of V.R. at least monthly this year, up 109.5% over 2016, according to eMarketer.

el0617 FullIssueV3 061617 14

The V.R. category is being driven mainly by 360-degree photos and videos. The gaming industry is also driving growth of V.R. headset use. In 2017, 9.6 million people in the U.S. will use a headset to experience V.R. monthly, up 98.7% over last year.

While V.R. headsets provide a more immersive experience, adoption will remain low due to their often high cost. This year, only 2.9% of the U.S. population will use a V.R. headset at least monthly, eMarketer estimates, with that number growing to just 5.2% by 2019.

—Source: eMarketer’s AR and Virtual Reality (VR) Forecast 2017

Published in Trends

In 2017, 40.0 million people in the U.S. will engage with some form of augmented reality (AR) at least monthly, up 30.2% over last year. Much of A.R.’s growth will be fueled by Snapchat Lenses and Facebook Stories, according to eMarketer.

By the end of 2019, A.R. users will top 54.4 million, accounting for 16.4% of the U.S. population, or nearly one in five Internet users.

el0617 FullIssueV3 061617 13

“Users of Snapchat Lenses comprise the vast majority of our A.R. estimates,” says eMarketer forecasting analyst Chris Bendtsen. “Snapchat growth will continue to contribute to A.R. users in the future, but in the next several years, eMarketer also expects Facebook Stories to be a significant growth driver of A.R. usage, since it is now widely available to Facebook’s user base.”

—Source: eMarketer’s AR and Virtual Reality (VR) Forecast 2017

Published in Trends

The global HR software market is projected to reach $9.2 billion by 2022, a CAGR of 2.4%. The growth rate masks a shift from traditional HR functions of payroll, time and attendance and benefits to the lucrative talent management sectors. These high-growth areas include recruiting, training, performance management/business intelligence and leadership/succession management as well as a shift to software-as-a-service.

While the HR software market went through an unprecedented wave of consolidation in recent years, the digital transformation is under way. The ERP software giants pursue a double strategy in acquiring HR software companies by expanding and integrating the new best-in-class HR management functionality into their comprehensive product/service offerings; and introducing broader ERP product/service offerings through HR management loophole.

Transportation and Logistics is the heavy-user of HCM solutions, according to Market & Markets. The growing technological developments in the field of Cloud, analytics and the emergence of mobile technologies have led to the high adoption of HCM solutions in major industries such as banking, financial services, insurance (BFSI), and health care.

By region, North America is expected to be the largest user of HCM solutions. The high adoption of digital technology across all major industries helps the HCM market to grow in North America, particularly in the U.S. and Canada. The market is in the emerging stage in the regions of Asia-Pacific (APAC), Latin America, the Middle East and Africa (MEA). Therefore, these regions exhibit immense scope for the adoption of HCM solutions.

—Sources: HR Software Market Forecast (2012-2022), Market Analysis https://www.marketanalysis.com/?p=338, HCM Market Worth, Markets & Market shttp://bit.ly/2rlbHVg

Published in Trends

The new technologies of what is being called the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” have the potential to transform the global geography of production and will need to be deployed in ways that address and adapt to the impact of climate change, reports the World Economic Forum in a paper titled, “Technology and Innovation for the Future of Production: Accelerating Value Creation.” The WEF paper, prepared in collaboration with AT Kearney, explores the new technology landscape, focusing on five technologies that will have the most immediate impact on production-related sectors. It raises questions for CEOs, government leaders, civil society leaders and academics about the implications for individuals, companies, industries, economies and society as a whole, and as is intended to bring new perspectives and generate responsive and responsible choices.

Capture7

The paper maps the full production value chain of activities of “source-make-deliver-consume-re-integrate” products and services from origination, design manufacturing and distribution to customers and consumers incorporating principles of circular economy and reuse. Production fundamentally impacts economic structure at a global to local level, affecting the level and nature of employment, and the environment.

The transformative potential of technology in production systems is widely recognized.Trends toward higher levels of automation promise greater speed and precision of production as well as reduced exposure to dangerous tasks. They also can help overcome stagnant productivity and make way for more value-added activity. The extent of automation, however, causing significant anxiety about issues of employment and inequality.

—Download full report at: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/ WEF_White_Paper_Technology_Innovation_Future_of_Produc- tion_2017.pdf

Published in Trends

With the new SALESFORCE- IBM global strategic partnership, IBM Watson, an A.I. platform for business, and Salesforce Einstein, A.I. that powers the world’s No. 1 CRM, seamlessly connect to enable an entirely new level of intelligent customer engagement across sales, service, marketing, commerce and more. IBM is also strategically investing in its Global Business Services for Salesforce with a new practice to help clients rapidly deploy the combined IBM Watson and Salesforce Einstein capabilities.

Published in Deals

BRAINSHARK and SEISMIC are partnering to help companies optimize sales readiness and performance, bringing together Brainshark’s training, coaching and content authoring capabilities with Seismic’s advanced solution for sales content management and personalization.

Published in Deals

LEARNZILLON LAUNCHES curriculum-as-a-service (CaaS) in Brazil for schools in a unique partnership between LearnZillion (platform provider), GOOGLE.ORG, LEMANN FOUNDATION and NOVA ESCOLA. The project follows similar successful LearnZillion (CaaS) partnerships with Louisiana and New Mexico. RAND looked at the impact in Louisiana, which found teachers were using these resources and it was quickly showing a positive impact on student achievement. This may save public schools money and forever changing a multi-billion dollar industry.

Published in Deals

Millennials are different than older generations in many ways. The generation gap is even wider when it comes to the sharing economy. Millennials embrace the sharing economy at three times the rate of older adults. Millennials are more likely to use a space to stay, like Airbnb, or use professional services, like tax preparation, than people ages 35 and older. While Uber and Airbnb are what many people think of when they think of the sharing economy, the market is more varied than that.

This may be an early indication that the next generation of digital services will be more acceptable to millennials. Robo-advisors for financial consulting and digital healthcare are being tested. For health care, virtual visits, second opinions and digital medicine delivery were most accepted by patients. When it came to robo-advisors, even the millennials had second thoughts. Only 48 percent would access digital advisors for basic financial information. However, the blended method of personal financial advi-sor with digital support was more successful doubling the success rate for investing.

—Source: Maru/Matchbox

Published in Latest News

The National Center for Simulation at the University of Central Florida (UCF) recognized the 2017 class of the Modeling and Simulation Hall of Fame in June. The five honorees are:

el0617 FullIssueV3 061617 11

David M. Kotick, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, chief modeling & simulation (M&S) engineer - A pioneer in virtual communications, he is the Department of Defense’s (DoD) leading subject-matter expert in the field, and holds multiple patents in the fields of digital communications within the Live Virtual Constructive environment.

Frederick L. Lewis, Rear Admiral, United States Navy (Ret.) - Served as the president from 1995-2012 of the National Training and Simulation Association.

Robert M. Matthews, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, retired deputy technical director - His imprint on M&S has touched not only a variety of disparate Navy programs across warfare branches, but also a variety of Navy and DoD modeling, simulation and training (MS&T) infrastructure initiatives.

Honorable John L. Mica, U.S. Representative - A champion for the simulation industry through policy, funding and loyal support.

Beverly J. Seay, M&S consultant & UCF Trustee - A founding business leader of the Orlando M&S community who was instrumental in bringing together government, industry and academia to lay the foundation and a set of standards for the integrated ecosystem it is today.

Published in Latest News

CHANGING YOUR PARADIGM ON HOW YOU WORK AND MANAGE MILLENNIALS CAN COMPLETELY CHANGE YOUR CANDIDATE POOLS.

BY BILL KLEYMAN

There’s clearly an evolution happening in our profession. The research firm Gartner recently reported that by 2020, 100 percent of technology roles will require at least an intermediate level of proficiency in business acumen.

“Developing strong business acumen is a prerequisite to effectively shift focus from optimizing operational efficiency to driving business effectiveness, value creation and growth,” Lily Mok, Gartner’s research vice president said. “At the heart of an effective communication strategy is the ability to clearly link the vision, strategy and action plans of the business to drive desired behaviors in the workforce that contribute to improved performance and business outcomes.”

Communication aside, new management styles are required to gain as much value as possible out of employees. Furthermore, these new management styles also introduce more value to the employees through new, exciting challenges, growth opportunities, and new ways to interact with the business.

MANAGING THE MILLENNIAL

We are firmly within the digital economy with a digitally-enabled workforce. This means we are a part of a fluid, dynamic business environment that is constantly evolving.

Millennials are the drivers of today’s emerging digital economy. Now that we have an idea as to how these legacies work, let’s examine a new approach to managing millennials that involves re-prioritizing the hiring traits we discussed earlier.

1.  Attitude: What is the candidate’s attitude toward the industry and the job at hand? Is he or she excited or just there to make a dollar? What’s driving him or her to succeed? A digital-ready organization will want a positive-attitude candidate who’s ready to emerge into the digital framework and be excited by change.

2. Aptitude: Once attitude is established, what is the candidate’s aptitude toward learning and growing? Does he or she want to take on more roles? Is he or she curious about cross-training? Going beyond what the candidate already knows, aptitude toward learning will allow you to hire a moldable and excited new member to the team.

3. Experience: Let me start by saying that experience is certainly important. But fluid organizations ready for the digital economy won’t hire for experience alone. They’ll want a positive attitude, the aptitude and capability to learn, and then the ability to evolve the experience. Having some experience is great, but it’s even better to mold the experience to what the organization really needs. In a way, we’ve flipped candidate capabilities and priorities to match the strengths of the millennial.

We’re allowing experience to grow organically around what the business requires. Ultimately, this gives the millennial candidate a voice within the company and an opportunity to grow and evolve with the company. Most of all, it builds loyalty and encourages thought.

Think of Facebook as an example. Yes, it loves your experiences and what you’ve done in the past; but it will very actively look at your attitude, your aptitude to learn new technologies, and your personality. These organizations know that if they hire the right people, the experience will come. However, it’ll also give these organizations an employee who’s much happier in his or her job.

Changing your paradigm on how you work and manage millennials can completely change your candidate pools. Furthermore, millennials don’t often work well in overly rigid environments. This is where they get restless, become less productive, and are more prone to leaving. However, if you employ and nurture around attitude and aptitude, you’ll see that not only will they get more experience, but also they’ll bring more value to your organization.

—The author is vice president of Strategy and Innovation at MTM Technologies, a Stamford, Connecticut-based consulting firm.

Published in Insights
Page 1 of 111

 


You are now being logged in using your Facebook credentials