The new technologies of what is being called the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” have the potential to transform the global geography of production and will need to be deployed in ways that address and adapt to the impact of climate change, reports the World Economic Forum in a paper titled, “Technology and Innovation for the Future of Production: Accelerating Value Creation.” The WEF paper, prepared in collaboration with AT Kearney, explores the new technology landscape, focusing on five technologies that will have the most immediate impact on production-related sectors. It raises questions for CEOs, government leaders, civil society leaders and academics about the implications for individuals, companies, industries, economies and society as a whole, and as is intended to bring new perspectives and generate responsive and responsible choices.

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The paper maps the full production value chain of activities of “source-make-deliver-consume-re-integrate” products and services from origination, design manufacturing and distribution to customers and consumers incorporating principles of circular economy and reuse. Production fundamentally impacts economic structure at a global to local level, affecting the level and nature of employment, and the environment.

The transformative potential of technology in production systems is widely recognized.Trends toward higher levels of automation promise greater speed and precision of production as well as reduced exposure to dangerous tasks. They also can help overcome stagnant productivity and make way for more value-added activity. The extent of automation, however, causing significant anxiety about issues of employment and inequality.

—Download full report at: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/ WEF_White_Paper_Technology_Innovation_Future_of_Produc- tion_2017.pdf

Published in Trends

With the new SALESFORCE- IBM global strategic partnership, IBM Watson, an A.I. platform for business, and Salesforce Einstein, A.I. that powers the world’s No. 1 CRM, seamlessly connect to enable an entirely new level of intelligent customer engagement across sales, service, marketing, commerce and more. IBM is also strategically investing in its Global Business Services for Salesforce with a new practice to help clients rapidly deploy the combined IBM Watson and Salesforce Einstein capabilities.

Published in Deals

BRAINSHARK and SEISMIC are partnering to help companies optimize sales readiness and performance, bringing together Brainshark’s training, coaching and content authoring capabilities with Seismic’s advanced solution for sales content management and personalization.

Published in Deals

LEARNZILLON LAUNCHES curriculum-as-a-service (CaaS) in Brazil for schools in a unique partnership between LearnZillion (platform provider), GOOGLE.ORG, LEMANN FOUNDATION and NOVA ESCOLA. The project follows similar successful LearnZillion (CaaS) partnerships with Louisiana and New Mexico. RAND looked at the impact in Louisiana, which found teachers were using these resources and it was quickly showing a positive impact on student achievement. This may save public schools money and forever changing a multi-billion dollar industry.

Published in Deals

Millennials are different than older generations in many ways. The generation gap is even wider when it comes to the sharing economy. Millennials embrace the sharing economy at three times the rate of older adults. Millennials are more likely to use a space to stay, like Airbnb, or use professional services, like tax preparation, than people ages 35 and older. While Uber and Airbnb are what many people think of when they think of the sharing economy, the market is more varied than that.

This may be an early indication that the next generation of digital services will be more acceptable to millennials. Robo-advisors for financial consulting and digital healthcare are being tested. For health care, virtual visits, second opinions and digital medicine delivery were most accepted by patients. When it came to robo-advisors, even the millennials had second thoughts. Only 48 percent would access digital advisors for basic financial information. However, the blended method of personal financial advi-sor with digital support was more successful doubling the success rate for investing.

—Source: Maru/Matchbox

Published in Latest News

The National Center for Simulation at the University of Central Florida (UCF) recognized the 2017 class of the Modeling and Simulation Hall of Fame in June. The five honorees are:

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David M. Kotick, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, chief modeling & simulation (M&S) engineer - A pioneer in virtual communications, he is the Department of Defense’s (DoD) leading subject-matter expert in the field, and holds multiple patents in the fields of digital communications within the Live Virtual Constructive environment.

Frederick L. Lewis, Rear Admiral, United States Navy (Ret.) - Served as the president from 1995-2012 of the National Training and Simulation Association.

Robert M. Matthews, Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, retired deputy technical director - His imprint on M&S has touched not only a variety of disparate Navy programs across warfare branches, but also a variety of Navy and DoD modeling, simulation and training (MS&T) infrastructure initiatives.

Honorable John L. Mica, U.S. Representative - A champion for the simulation industry through policy, funding and loyal support.

Beverly J. Seay, M&S consultant & UCF Trustee - A founding business leader of the Orlando M&S community who was instrumental in bringing together government, industry and academia to lay the foundation and a set of standards for the integrated ecosystem it is today.

Published in Latest News

CHANGING YOUR PARADIGM ON HOW YOU WORK AND MANAGE MILLENNIALS CAN COMPLETELY CHANGE YOUR CANDIDATE POOLS.

BY BILL KLEYMAN

There’s clearly an evolution happening in our profession. The research firm Gartner recently reported that by 2020, 100 percent of technology roles will require at least an intermediate level of proficiency in business acumen.

“Developing strong business acumen is a prerequisite to effectively shift focus from optimizing operational efficiency to driving business effectiveness, value creation and growth,” Lily Mok, Gartner’s research vice president said. “At the heart of an effective communication strategy is the ability to clearly link the vision, strategy and action plans of the business to drive desired behaviors in the workforce that contribute to improved performance and business outcomes.”

Communication aside, new management styles are required to gain as much value as possible out of employees. Furthermore, these new management styles also introduce more value to the employees through new, exciting challenges, growth opportunities, and new ways to interact with the business.

MANAGING THE MILLENNIAL

We are firmly within the digital economy with a digitally-enabled workforce. This means we are a part of a fluid, dynamic business environment that is constantly evolving.

Millennials are the drivers of today’s emerging digital economy. Now that we have an idea as to how these legacies work, let’s examine a new approach to managing millennials that involves re-prioritizing the hiring traits we discussed earlier.

1.  Attitude: What is the candidate’s attitude toward the industry and the job at hand? Is he or she excited or just there to make a dollar? What’s driving him or her to succeed? A digital-ready organization will want a positive-attitude candidate who’s ready to emerge into the digital framework and be excited by change.

2. Aptitude: Once attitude is established, what is the candidate’s aptitude toward learning and growing? Does he or she want to take on more roles? Is he or she curious about cross-training? Going beyond what the candidate already knows, aptitude toward learning will allow you to hire a moldable and excited new member to the team.

3. Experience: Let me start by saying that experience is certainly important. But fluid organizations ready for the digital economy won’t hire for experience alone. They’ll want a positive attitude, the aptitude and capability to learn, and then the ability to evolve the experience. Having some experience is great, but it’s even better to mold the experience to what the organization really needs. In a way, we’ve flipped candidate capabilities and priorities to match the strengths of the millennial.

We’re allowing experience to grow organically around what the business requires. Ultimately, this gives the millennial candidate a voice within the company and an opportunity to grow and evolve with the company. Most of all, it builds loyalty and encourages thought.

Think of Facebook as an example. Yes, it loves your experiences and what you’ve done in the past; but it will very actively look at your attitude, your aptitude to learn new technologies, and your personality. These organizations know that if they hire the right people, the experience will come. However, it’ll also give these organizations an employee who’s much happier in his or her job.

Changing your paradigm on how you work and manage millennials can completely change your candidate pools. Furthermore, millennials don’t often work well in overly rigid environments. This is where they get restless, become less productive, and are more prone to leaving. However, if you employ and nurture around attitude and aptitude, you’ll see that not only will they get more experience, but also they’ll bring more value to your organization.

—The author is vice president of Strategy and Innovation at MTM Technologies, a Stamford, Connecticut-based consulting firm.

Published in Insights

Y ANNICK RENAUD-COULON

WHY DID YOU LAUNCH THE GLOBAL COUNCIL OF CORPORATE UNIVERSITIES?

I launched GlobalCCU in 2005 together with a handful of corporate university directors from Brazil, the U.S.A., Spain and France. I had the vision of creating a global network of corporate universities, in line with the growing globalization of the economy.

This profession, still very young, was born in the greatest empiricism, and the corporate university executives were in search of exchanges with their peers to avoid wasting time in their process. They needed benchmarking, to compare themselves and understand how leaders in their sector were successful. I also wanted to demonstrate that corporate universities were not training centers but key strategic levers to challenge and implement business strategies and federate around the company’s culture and brand.

The biggest mistake is cultural. They must avoid management by values that are too inopportune. If each culture is based on values, and if philosophy leads us to think that there are universal values, such as beauty and truth, they are only superficially universal. Their definition and translation into practice varies profoundly from one culture to another, from one company to another.

They must also avoid economic nationalism through education. I can attest to the fact that we learn a lot from emerging countries in terms of corporate learning and development. The corporate universities of these countries are often far ahead in many areas, in the impact of learning on business, in their holistic approach between human and digital, or in the implementation of social responsibility via education. From this viewpoint, the GlobalCCU Awards are a very interesting global observatory.

I strongly suggest that with a lot of humility and a lot of listening to better understand nations that are geographically far away, we can get rid of our prejudices. The corporate universities, which are unique and irreplaceable spaces of openness to the world, have to tackle the different ways to access knowledge, depending on the culture and countries and particularly depending on the use of learning technologies that are not suitable to everyone or to all situations. In other words, beyond the clichés and the easy playing fields of technology, they have more than ever to identify the real skills needs for today and tomorrow — for people, business and society.

GLOBALCCU OFFERS A CERTIFICATION PROGRAM. WHAT DOES IT ENTAIL?

The GlobalCCU CU Certification is the highest global recognition of the existence, the reliability and the level of maturity, of performance and excellence of a corporate university. It is delivered at the end of an in-depth and gradual assessment process with certified auditors, developed and placed under my responsibility.

In just 18 months, the corporate university can achieve the entire three-step process and communicate its excellence to its stakeholders. At the end of the complete certification journey, our CU Certification allows the company and its stakeholders to be sure that their educational structure performs at the best-in-class corporate universities worldwide level.

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Published in Insights

DO WE FULLY UNDERSTAND THE BROAD MIX OF WORKFORCE SKILLS NECESSARY FOR FUTURE SUCCESS?

BY SIMON HANN &  SOPHIE LANYON

Three global forces are revolutionizing the way we work: automation, globalization and technology. The accelerating pace of technological, demographic and socio-economic disruption is transforming industries and business models and changing the skills that employers need. Job profiles are changing rapidly, and — according to the World Economic Forum (2016) — the most in-demand occupations today did not exist ten or even five years ago.

It prompts the question: what skills are important in the face of change and disruption?

Formal qualifications and technical skills are only part of the requirements for today’s workforce. The importance of soft skills is growing. Deloitte Access Economics (2017) forecasts that soft-skill-intensive occupations will account for two-thirds of all jobs by 2030, compared to half of all jobs in 2000. That’s a significant workforce change. Soft skills are important to drive business outcomes. Contributing to overall staff productivity,employees with more soft skills could increase business revenue by over $90,000, reports the Deloitte Access Economics, 2017. (This figure is based on an increase to the average Australian business revenue of $3 million as reported by the Australian Taxation Office for 2013-14 financial year.)

Does the workforce have the soft skills to foster business success now and in the future?

Based on a new analysis of résumés and job listings, by Deloitte Access Economics (2017), there appears to be a significant gap between job market demand and supply of soft skills. Demand exceeds supply by exceeding supply by 45 percent. In addition, less than 1 percent of Australian professionals list soft skills on their LinkedIn profile. Soft skills clearly are important for all occupations and industries, yet there appears to be a shortage of these skills.

Businesses in Australia spend a staggering $11 billion on employee training and staff recruitment annually, according to the Department of Employment (2016). On-the-job training — whether it be through workshops and courses, e-learning or traineeships — is seen by businesses as important in teaching both technical and soft skills. Furthermore, the abundance of information, resources and development programs at peoples’ fingertips means they can acquire knowledge or skills without formal training. The ability to develop skills will increasingly be on the individual; it has become an economic imperative for individuals to become lifelong learners.

If training, both formal and informal, is important to organizations, why is the gap significant? It can be difficult for business and individuals to objectively assess skill levels. The lack of formal confirmation of soft skills is playing a role in this gap as people don’t have the confidence to claim skills that they are not able to verify.

CLOSING THE GAP

This is where recognizing soft skills with micro-credentials will enable businesses to identify gaps in their organization and, ultimately, make informed strategic decisions on how to effectively invest in building their workforce capability in the years to come.

Micro-credentials underpin a culture of empowered and motivated learning while at the same time increasing employee engagement through recognition. It is not part of a learning strategy — it is part of a business performance strategy. In the future of work, the most essential factor for an individual and his or her future potential is the ability to adapt and expand personal knowledge and skills. Micro-credentials can be the recognition and transportable symbol of capabilities in action which individuals and businesses will use to navigate the future world of work in the digital age. Micro-credentials are available from various organizations, including DeakinCo., Udacity and Coursera.

—Simon Hann is the CEO of both DeakinCo. and DeakinPrime, backed by Deakin University in Australia. In his roles, he is passionate about exploring the impact of digital disruption on the workforce and providing businesses with solutions to prepare for the future. Sophie Lanyon is the Product Engagement Specialist at DeakinCo. To find out more about DeakinCo. please visit deakinco.

Published in Ideas

AUGMENTATION OF THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE IS ENABLING ACQUISITION OF 21ST- CENTURY SKILLS AND METACOMPETENCIES WHILE ENHANCING THE JOY OF LEARNING.

BY DR. SHRADHA KANWAR

The Web 3.0 era heralds the beginning of exhilarating times in the learning space. Imagine a world of learning where the flow of information is a beautiful choreography, rapturously engaging the learners as well as inspiring them to become part of the performing spectacle. Here, the words, sounds and motion relate to every sense of the being, create a synergistic impression, and build a composite understanding. This is the new learning engagement, and this is becoming real because of augmented reality (AR).

Augmented reality is not an aberration or an astounding world of disbelief, but a very pragmatic, yet powerful, integration of digital information that triggers the brain to perceive information differently. It is a judicious combination of the real-world environment with an extended overlay of new knowledge using technology as the powerful means to drive information in a multi-modal form.

AR overcomes a striking impediment of ordinary learning by introducing deeper, richer and more personalized learning experience. An infusion of play and humor (a characteristic of game-based learning), along with an intense reflection as part of the decision making process, ensures a popular, self-directed form of learning.

EXPERIENCING  NEW LEARNING

Imagined scenarios that extend the learning experience significantly boost the impact of a learning. For educators, researchers and practitioners, this realistic superimposition of a real-world setting as an augmented context with realistic visualization, provides a unique platform to customize teaching. By appropriate selection of ed-tech tools to make learning more adaptive and attuned to students’ learning styles, a lot can be done to expand its scope many fold.

A very tangible form of introducing AR in the learning scenario is by embedding visual data with static content, such as textbooks and presentations, thus enhancing oral instruction and written material. Regular teaching tools augmented to introduce fantastic 3-D elements, exaggerated visual scenarios, strategically implanting distorted data inputs even sometimes drifting towards visual infidelity, can advance memory recall and long-term learning.

Apart from the tremendous design appeal, another prime benefit is its ability to craft a differentiated learning environment, thus aiding learners with different multiple intelligences and learning styles. Kinaesthetic learners, who dominate the centennial generation, benefit the most as this multimodality of content is in alignment with their information processing patterns.

AUGMENTING NEW SKILLS

Maximum presence of AR has been evidenced in gaming. The learning space has always been the last to be benefited by advancements in technology. But things seem to be disrupting considerably, especially in these rapidly evolving times. The process of navigating through more engaging content results in learners becoming more intuitive and critical thinkers with a heightened prowess to creatively solve problems. Another contribution of AR is its ability to introduce a temperament of inquiry and curiosity, a necessary attribute of the 21st century learner.

AR amplifies the spatial and visual perceptions, substantially engaging learners. Once upon a time the word “digital” was looked up to with much awe and bewilderment. This is no longer the case, as everything spans digital today with no exception. Hence, words such as “augmented” and “virtual” that seem to be breaching the boundaries of reality, are in a very short span of time likely to become regular manifestations in the learning eco system.

Augmented reality, a beautiful coalescing of virtual with real, is all set to redefine learning scenarios. While augmented reality and its explorations into the learning space still seem to be at a nascent stage, the prospects seem to be never better than now. These are indeed the beginning of exhilarating times, where augmented is the new real!

–Dr. Shradha Kanwar is the National Head for Learning and Development at iNurture Education, an India-based education firm offering under graduate and post graduate programs in new-age domains across 30+ universities and colleges in India. She is an edu-scientist and an innovative learning technologies evangelist. Dr Kanwar has over 18 years of diverse experience in driving excellence and deep insight into creative intelligences and implementation of innovative learning solutions.

Published in Ideas
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