U.S. employees still stick with their trusty desktop computers when it comes to on-the-job devices, based on a September 2014 study. However, this may not last forever, as there was a noticeable drop in desktop usage between 2011 and 2014, from 84% of U.S. employees to 71%.

Though a meager 7% of respondents reported using tablets for work, they were the only device type that saw an increase in usage. Laptops saw a tiny decline in usage, as did smartphones.

Meanwhile, another study (from CNBC) found that 78% of business execs worldwide use their smartphones for business and 75% use tablets.

Published in Latest News

In 2014, global investments made to learning technology companies reached $2.34 billion, up from the previous record of $1.64 billion set in 2013. This marks the sixth time in the last 16 years that investment totals exceeded the billion-dollar threshold and the first time in the history of learning technology that investment reached the $2 billion threshold.

“The most significant investment patterns in the learning technology industry in 2014 were the spike in funding of companies operating in China, a dramatic increase in investments made to self-paced e-learning companies, and a renewed investor interest in corporate-facing learning technology companies,” says Ambient Insight’s chief research officer Sam S. Adkins. “Investments in companies operating in China accounted for 24% of all investments made to learning technology companies in 2014.”

There was a sharp spike in investments going to self-paced e-learning companies, reaching $1.07 billion in 2014, up from $565.3 million in 2013.

Published in Latest News

Instructors and students in higher ed are continuing to offer and take MOOCs (massive open online courses) in growing numbers. So in 2015 and beyond, educational institutions will begin to leverage MOOC content (via virtual and blended learning) in their own campuses and continuing education curricula.

Key developments this past year in the MOOC space:

>> MOOC providers roll out their own credentials - Each of the Big 3 MOOC providers introduced their own credentials for paid courses: Udacity’s Nanodegrees, Coursera’s Specializations and edX’s Xseries.

>> Upping the production quality – Universities, seeing both large markets and big uncertainties in the online learning world, have organized and staffed centralized departments to support professors creating these courses, like Harvard’s in-house course production studio.

>> A trend toward “always on” availability - Udacity was the first provider to adopt a self-paced model, back in 2012, which gets closer to the model used by Udemy and Lynda.com. Coursera and FutureLearn are joining in. The challenge will be in providing the interaction and/or assistance most MOOC-takers expect via discussion forums or other methods.

Published in Latest News

Mobile is becoming more of a key area for sales training with nearly one in three organizations investing in it for next year (22% say they use it now). Currently, only 26% pieces of sales training content is accessed via mobile, according to the trainers surveyed.

Current inhibitors to mobile sales training adoption include:

>> Content not well-formatted for mobile - 46%

>> Content too long for mobile - 37%

>> Interactive content doesn’t work on mobile - 30%

>> Difficult to ensure content works across platforms - 25%

“Sales reps are just-in-time learners, and as they’re frequently in the field and on the road, mobile access is a key factor in training effectiveness,” says Brainshark president Greg Flynn. “To be successful, reps need to be able to find content at the time and place they need it — and that is frequently from their phone or tablet. Organizations looking to reach reps at the moment of need are looking to more visual, interactive mediums that deliver a great experience for the learner on any device.”

Published in Latest News

Cellular carriers spent $44.9 billion during a recent auction of wireless frequencies by the Federal Communications Commission.

The eye-popping bids that blew past even the highest government estimates are a testament to soaring demand for mobile Internet service. These frequencies, also known as spectrum, are needed to expand cellular networks so they can carry more phone calls and data.

The additional bandwidth will help cell customers stream high-quality videos and download apps more quickly. Without sufficient airwaves, wireless networks can become congested and slow.

“The results of this auction confirm the strong market demand for more spectrum,” FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler commented. “We are confident there will continue to be strong demand for valuable low-band spectrum that will be made available in the Incentive Auction early next year.”

The U.S. government plans to use about $7 billion of the revenue to build a nationwide high-speed communications network for firefighters and police officers. The rest will go to paying down the federal debt.

Published in Latest News

Three Key Components Of A Human Resources-oriented Culture Can Afford Any Company Big Payoffs In The Long Run.

By Jerry Roche

Scripps Health is by no means your average organization. But its employee-focused corporate philosophy has the potential to help turn any average company or organization into a “career destination.”

Since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA or “Obamacare”) in 2010, there has been a massive change in the health-care industry. They have impacted Scripps, the largest health-care organization in the San Diego area with four hospitals on five campuses, 26 outpatient and specialty centers, almost 14,000 employees, 1,500 volunteers, 158 medical residents and fellows, and 2,600 contracted physicians. But Scripps has developed a formula that will enable it to be not only competitive but dominant as more of the ACA is rolled out in the coming months and years.

“We’re dealing with making a lot of moving parts come together,” says Veronica Zaman, the Scripps vice president of Human Resources and Learning. “We are finding that our reimbursement rates are declining. It is so incredibly important that we have staff that are well-trained, that understand how to work collaboratively, how to drive toward teamwork, and how to maximize the work we used to do, in a different way. The culture of Scripps is one that has been created to enhance our capacity to make sure we have the right people in the right place with the right skillsets."

Amanda Kienast, director of Talent Acquisition, adds: “We think of ourselves as a career destination employer, and we’re committed to offering our employees every opportunity to realize their professional goals [at Scripps]. If we do it right, there’s no need for employees to leave the organization. We take pride in providing an environment where our employees can enjoy a supportive, collaborative workplace with a united vision."

To that end, Scripps Health is making every attempt to stay ahead of the talent curve. Its talent management team works to be proactive in hiring, developing and supporting employees to create the best opportunities for both them and the organization. It all starts with the hiring process.

“We strive to hire candidates with characteristics closely aligned with our values of quality, respect and efficiency,” notes Kienast. “As part of our career destination philosophy, we’ve developed several innovative hiring and retention practices. We seek to hire top talent and then develop their skills and knowledge to do the following: provide quality clinical care and service; innovate new services and care models; and lead and manage change."

To attract potential candidates, Scripps uses social media, Web campaigns, search engine marketing and optimization, and more. On a more traditional level, it sends recruiting representatives to campus career and other off-site events. It also has a robust employee referral program.

Then, “we use a variety of analytical and online tools to assess candidates and talent for the best organizational fit,” Kienast notes. Scripps provides education, training and development programs to help employees and the organization stay competitive and successful: “We work with our talent managers on how to identify and grow talent within their depts. Our talent management team meets with employees to promote growth opportunities and assist them in discovering educational or financial resources that they would need to succeed in career development.”

Because Scripps is so large, there are plenty of chances for any employee to move either horizontally or vertically within the organization. That gives them a chance to take on new projects, new responsibilities and new challenges.

“The [internal] pipeline process was very well thought-out," says Zaman. “It’s built on a prescriptive process. We use the same assessment tools and the same criteria that we use when we hire. It’s not so much about the skills. It’s really about making sure people have those characteristics that make them a strong team player.”

Starting At The Top

“Heading us in this journey is Chris Van Gorder, our president and CEO, who’s a key member of our team,” Zaman continues. “At a time when health care is feeling the tightening reins of the reform and reimbursement that is diminishing, we have at our helm a leader with his passion for learning.

One of Van Gorder’s strengths is that, every day, he asks himself and he charges every employee to ask the question: “Did I make [our founders] proud today of what I’ve done?”

When Van Gorder became president, Scripps had a first-year turnover rate of 30 percent. In other words, a revolving door. Morale was at its lowest point ever, but his commitment to his employees and his focus on learning helped turn everything around.

“At a time when health care is feeling the tightening reins of the reform and reimbursement that is diminishing, we have at our helm a leader with his passion for learning,” notes Zaman. “He is hands-on, at the front line, with our patients, and a big piece of our success is the collaboration among Chris and all our team members.”

‘Value By Design’

Scripps managers list four strategies for success:

Innovate to manage the health of the people it serves.

Transform delivery of clinical care.

Move to new payment models.

Implement “Value by Design.”

“‘Value by Design’ is our term internally to describe how we are developing and engaging our workforce to reduce cost, eliminate waste and create value,” says Stephanie Becerra, a senior corporate director. “We are utilizing lean principles to help adapt to the rapidly changing health-care environment. It requires employees to innovate, to engage, and to behave in a different way.

“We are providing learning to help them. Learning starts from day one in new employee orientation.” Then, “all employees actively participate, share their expertise and become creative thought leaders — not just identify problems but to solve them and take ownership of their solutions. They also must speak up and have courage to expose challenges, to not create work- arounds, because work arounds won’t get us to where we need to go as an organization. They must help us to see what the challenges are that inhibit them from performing at their maximum.”

Another key part of this forward-thinking approach is the active participation of leadership.

“Our expectation of our leaders is to work with their staff in a new way," Becerra notes, “involving them in problem-solving, hearing from them, listening and coaching them to identify better ways to work.”

In the end, it’s getting cooperation at every level, Becerra continues:

“Our expectations are for staff to engage in higher levels of trust with each other, and to try new ways of doing things. Right now, we have a culture that thinks outside of the box. We have formal learning to help create that culture, classroom settings, workshop settings. We’re also taking learning out to staff and management in the units, coaching and helping them understand this lean way of thinking.”

A Successful Program

Last year, Scripps Health was not only named to Elearning! magazine’s “Learning 100” list, it was at the top of the private sector list. One of the programs that helped Scripps attain that lofty position was its new Graduate RN Residency Dedicated Education Unit — a perfect example of how the company treats its valued employees.

Scripps designed the DEU program to achieve higher levels of satisfaction and retention among new graduate nurses and improve performance. The 12-month program is divided into two phases.

Phase One consists of nine months on a dedicated education unit with emphasis on developing knowledge and critical thinking skills while building a confident and competent practice within the Scripps care model. It also ensures standardization of practice in the training and development of the new nurse. A critical aspect of this experience is pairing the new grad with a dedicated clinical coach who has specialized training to provide structured support. These coaches validate skills and knowledge needed to practice independently and provide consistent feedback on the resident’s strengths, needs and individual performance goals.

Phase Two of the program consists of a facilitated transition plan to the new graduate’s assigned home unit.

In 2013, 147 new graduate nurses were placed in the Scripps system, and 132 were on target for placement in 2014. Both mentors and participants have given the program glowing reviews.

New graduate Bridgid McGowan, RN, says: “The clinical coaches have made the transition from student to new grad RN, while not easy, definitely less painful than I imagined. The support I’ve felt from the program is what has gotten me through many a difficult shift, and I am eternally grateful to have been a part of this educational new grad program.”

Onward And Upward

“We know there will be challenges ahead: an aging workforce, new generations with different preferences, a continued shift in health-care reform; forecasting and planning for service expansion, growth, turnover and retirement,” Kienast notes.

But if the past is prologue, Scripps Health will be on the cutting edge of innovation, employee growth and patient care. It will continue to be a “career destination employer."

Published in Ideas

Analysts Disagree On How Quickly Organizations Can Adapt Learning To Wearable Technology.

By Jerry Roche

About 13 million wearable tech devices were shipped in 2013. That number is expected to increase to 170 million by 2018.

Certainly, wearable technology like Google Glass and smartwatches from various manufacturers have the potential to at least support — if not indirectly administer — learning. Specifically, these types of products could provide feedback that tells learners how well they are doing and focuses their attention on key information that they might normally miss.

Though the U.S. market is on the leading edge of wearable adoption, more research into wearables in the workplace has taken place in Europe.

In the United Kingdom, I.T. bosses see 69 percent of staff bring wearables into their organizations, according to a survey by Trend Micro. Research by that I.T. security firm also showed 91 percent of organizations expect the number of employees bringing their own wearable devices to work to increase in the next year. Although there is a lack of concern over wearables entering the workplace, 85 percent of respondents said they are aware of the security risks wearables may bring.

The biggest concern for I.T. professionals bringing wearables into the workplace is identity theft, which was cited by 47 percent of participants in the Trend Micro survey. The second is that employees were unaware of the policies or issues surrounding wearable devices in the workplace.

Additionally, a third of European businesses will introduce wearable technology to the workplace in 2015, according to the systems monitoring and I.T. automation company Ipswitch. The problem is that only 13 percent of companies have a policy in place to deal with it.

The tech industry itself looks at wearables as a potential prime repository of massive amounts of imbedded sensors, especially when they’re imbedded into gadgets that can coordinate and communicate with one another.

At the International CES (Computer Electronics Show) earlier this year, Intel Corp. CEO Brian Krzanich led his company’s keynote address by saying that 2015 will mark the next technology consumer wave. “We’re moving from a two- dimensional world to a three-dimensional world,” he said. “This additional dimension will change how we experience computing." In citing the evolution of wearables as one force that will shape this next wave, Krzanich touted Intel innovations such as Real Sense, which can interpret depth; True Key, with recognition capability that eliminates need for passwords; and the Curie wearable, which can identify different sporting activities.

Those and similar devices, mostly popular among tech-savvy consumers, have yet to be tied into any learning initiatives. But in a larger sense, they are indicative of a massive coming change in our everyday lives wherein technology actually lives with and on our bodies. The potential trend might be similar to how smartphones have not only entered into but dominated the corporate learning conversation. (Who would have predicted 15 years ago that we would be taking our training through telephones?)

“It isn’t really a stretch of imagination to consider how this technology can be put for learning assistance or performance — just like designers subsumed personal computers, and now tablets and smartphones,” notes Upside Learning’s Abhijit Kadle.

He further believes that real sharing will play a key role: “We’ve realized that learning can be better in a culture driven by sharing. As wearable computing allows us to actually stream data about every little activity we engage in, this will generate large volumes of data [that] can be considered as learning content, quite unlike conventional ideas of what content should look like. Video, audio, images, text and now V.R. [virtual reality] and A.R. [augmented reality], coupled with an understanding of context, can potentially transform learning and performance support at a very fundamental level.”

Virtual, Augmented Reality

When it comes to learning applications for wearables, the most obvious is in the realm of virtual and augmented reality, which includes serious games.

Indeed, when a wearable computer was first introduced to the U.S. Army way back in 1989, it was meant to assist soldiers in battle. Since then, a host of serious games have been introduced to help soldiers learn how to cope with certain combat scenarios.

Wearables can take the learning possibilities presented by A.R. one step further. A new product called “Sixth Sense,” which was developed at the MIT Media Lab, can digitally augment the five natural senses. Worn around the neck like a very large pendant, the device includes a tiny projector and mirror that can shine an image onto just about any surface. It’s not difficult to see that such a feature could be used to project training videos to employees, anywhere, anytime.

Memory Storage

One of the key functions of wearable computers is augmenting the user’s memory. Rather than storing knowledge into memory, employees can use performance tools to complete the tasks at hand. When they need to perform that task again, they just reuse the tools they need.

This benefit makes wearables ideal for presenting technical documentation to certain audiences like maintenance engineers. Engineers traditionally refer to paper-based manuals, but they are in- creasingly being replaced with electronic formats called Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs).

Wearable IETM systems may be effective on-the-job training tools as new engineers are guided through unfamiliar tasks without having to refer back to manuals on the workbench. Preliminary testing has shown that wearable computer-based IETMs can be highly beneficial despite numerous usability issues with the equipment.

Initial participants in a research project by David Liu of the University of Queensland in Australia noted that looking up technical manuals on a wearable is far less tedious than having to constantly refer back to a desktop computer. Inexperienced users found the step-by-step guiding very helpful as training aids, especially photographic illustrations for each step.

An ‘eye’ To The Future

As much as we hear and read about current technological advancements like the “Internet of Things," Samsung’s and Apple’s smartwatches and Google Glass, they are in their infancy. And there exists a disagreement among tech analysts about how quickly wearable devices will be accepted.

One camp believes that they will not make any widespread impacts in the way we work over the next decade.

“It’s probably going to take several more years for us to work through a lot of the technological issues, a lot of the issues in the ecosystem, a lot of the issues around the data science, and helping [people] understand the category and the benefits,” Dan Ledger of Endeavour Partners has said.

Another camp believes the wearable revolution could take shape much faster than the recent mobile revolution, which started in the early 1990s.

Bill Wasik on wired.com notes: “Sensors and chip sets are cheaper now than ever, making it easier for small companies to incorporate sophisticated hardware into wearable devices. And while smartphone manufacturers had to master the tricky art of providing dependable mobile Internet service, wearable manufacturers can piggyback on those innovations using simple Bluetooth or other protocols to communicate with a smartphone and thus with the outside world. With all that prebaked hardware and wireless connectivity — and huge preorders from crowd-funding platforms like Kickstarter — it has become possible for tiny companies to dream up, build and sell wearable devices in competition with big companies, a feat that was never possible with smartphones.”

Google and others are finding that drawbacks to wearables include users feeling a sense of isolation and non-users feeling disenfranchised. The company has stopped selling its much-hyped Google Glass; tech analysts are predicting that it will be “reinvented” as a different product, perhaps a watch-like solution.

Marcel Bullinga, futurist and author, thinks wearables will result in actual diminished work skills. “A major global megatrend is ‘de-skilling.’ Our children will learn less and achieve more. Of course, they will also suffer from major social media stress traumas.”

Conclusions

Wearable technology is in its infancy. Many of its most obvious uses are consumer- rather than business-oriented. To date, few learning/training applications exist. But as the trend catches on, it’s believed that developers eventually will come up with corporate and educational learning-related applications and the software.

“It will be a world more integrated than ever before," notes Bryan Alexander, senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education. “We will see more work teams, study groups and collaborations.”

Published in Top Stories

Corona, CA January 28, 2015 - Elearning! Media Group, producers of the Enterprise Learning! Conference 2015 (ELC15), is pleased to announce its groundbreaking lineup of Keynote Speakers for the Enterprise Learning! Conference 2015. Colonel Ronald Dodge, West Point CIO and the Associate Dean for Information and Education Technology will speak about 'Next Generation Learning Environments and Cybersecurity.' ELC15 theme is Building Smarter Organizations with tracks dedicated to Next Generation Learning Environments, Learning Analytics & Big Data, The Internet of Things in Learning and the Learning! 100 Best Practices.

Dodge's keynote will take a light hearted look at finding the security teetering point between usability and protection of learning data and infrastructure in our environment. Ronald Dodge is an Associate Professor permanently stationed at the United States Military Academy where he serves as the West Point CIO and the Associate Dean for Information and Education Technology. Prior to this role, he was a senior research scientist and Director of the West Point Information Technology and Operations Center, where he led research into emerging technologies and grew cyber security awareness programs around the United States through innovative and pioneering use of virtualization, information assurance curriculum, and cyber security exercises. Ron is an active duty Colonel in the United States Army and has served over 27 years with military assignments ranging from combat duties in an attack helicopter squadron to faculty at the United States Military Academy.

"We are thrilled to have Colonel Dodge as one of our keynote speakers. He has such vast expertise on timely topics of next generation learning environments and cybersecurity," said Catherine Upton, ELC 2015 conference chair. "We seek experts that own the learning technology initiatives within their organizations and drive performance to the edge. COL Dodge has steered learning in the Defense Department, and now shares his expertise with the next generation of learners and virtualization practitioners. His knowledge and experience in this field is virtually unmatched, and our audience is guaranteed to take away ideas and information that they will be able to implement in their businesses and institutions immediately," concludes Upton.

Colonel Dodge's Keynote address will take place on Wednesday, June 10th at 9:30am at the Hylton Center for Performing Arts in Manassas, VA.

Who Should Attend
Enterprise Learning! Conference 2015 (ELC15) hosts the exclusive Learning & Workplace Technology Conference for corporate, government and higher education executives June 8-10, 2015. ELC15 also hosts the Innovations in E-learning Symposium, in partnership with the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) and George Mason University (GMU). At ELC15, attendees can learn from learning technology academia, share best practices from the top corporate university-Defense Acquisition University, and network with the top global learning organizations, the 2015 Learning! 100. Altogether, ELC15 provides executives a collegiate environment to network, share and learn from leaders across government, education and corporate enterprise.

ELC15 Partners
Defense Acquisition University
Defense Acquisition University is an award winning corporate university for the 150,000 members of the Defense Acquisition Workforce. DAU uses classroom and Web-based training and certification programs to keep all acquisition workforce members abreast with the latest trends, developments, resources, and information available for the acquisition community. While DAU faculty use a variety of proven teaching techniques to impart information to students, including both lecture and case-based curriculum, they are also on the forefront of innovative teaching techniques such as flipped classroom and distance-learning via Telepresence suites to reach remotely located workforce members while maintaining a low per-student cost. DAU faculty not only provide the certification training that qualified acquisition professionals need now, but continuously develop the body of acquisition knowledge to meet future learning requirements. Learn more at: www.dau.gov

George Mason University
George Mason University is Virginia's largest public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls more than 33,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the past half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity, and commitment to accessibility. Mason is setting the gold standard for the modern, public university. Its dynamic culture and innovative academic programs prepare Mason's hard-working students for 21st century careers. Its commitment to teaching excellence combines with cutting-edge research that enriches the academic experience and is literally changing the world. Mason is also one of the best values in higher education, producing graduates who lead all Virginia schools with the highest annual salaries. Learn more at: www.gmu.edu

Enterprise Learning! Events
Since 2008, Enterprise Learning! Events bring onsite and online audiences together to learn, network and share. Mark your calendar for Enterprise Learning! Conference on June 8-10, 2015 in Manassas, VA. CA. Enterprise Learning! Conference hosts Innovations in E-learning Symposium, the Best of Elearning! and Learning! 100 Awards. The Enterprise Learning! Summit virtual editions are slated for January 15, July 15, and November 4, 2015. For more information about the Enterprise Learning! Conference visit http://www.elceshow.com.

Elearning! Media Group
Elearning! Media Group is owned by B2B Media Group LLC. Elearning! Media Group consists of eleven media products including: Elearning! Magazine, Government Elearning! E-Magazine, e-mail newsletters, Alerts, Websites, Web seminars, the Enterprise Learning! Summit and Enterprise Learning! Conference. Elearning! Media Group serves the $220 billion learning & workplace technology market. Suppliers and practitioners can follow us: online at www.2elearning.com; on Twitter: 2elearning or #ELSummit; via Facebook: Elearning!-Magazine or LinkedIn: Elearning! Magazine Network or Elearning! Summit.

Published in Latest News

Powerhouse Partnership with Defense Acquisition University & George Mason University Announced

Corona, CA January 27, 2015 - Elearning! Media Group, the leader in learning and workplace technology media, announced the Enterprise Learning! Conference will co-host the 13th Annual Innovations in E-learning Symposium with partners Defense Acquisition University, corporate university within the Department of Defense, and George Mason University. The partners will develop the conference, workshop and keynotes cooperatively, and host at the Enterprise Learning! Conference, June 8-10, 2015 in Manassas, VA.

"We are honored to be partnering with DAU and GMU to co-host the Innovations in E-learning Symposium within the Enterprise Learning! Conference. In today's world, technology is an enabler for learning and talent development. With this partnership, we are able to feature cutting edge practitioners alongside front line academic researchers, to our growing corporate enterprise audience," reports Catherine Upton, Group Publisher, and Conference Chair Person, Elearning! Media Group.

The Enterprise Learning! Conference 2015 will be an unprecedented gathering of the nation's most influential and creative thought leaders and executives from corporate enterprise, government agencies, higher education and non-profit organizations. The three partners in this conference are at the forefront of one of the fastest growing areas in today's marketplace and their vast amount of knowledge is unparalled.

"We are excited about this event. Great keynote speakers and just the right mix of Academic, Government, and Practitioners! Come share your best practices and learn from the very best," invites Dr. Christopher Hardy, Strategy Director, Defense Acquisition University.

The ELC15 conference features four distinct tracks supporting the theme of 'Building Smarter Organizations.' They are:
• Learning Environments for the Next Generation
• Smart Connected Things in Learning
• Learning Analytics & Performance in the Big Data Age
• The Learning! 100 Best Practices

Attendees of the conference are management level learning leaders charged with building smarter organizations via learning & workplace technologies. Each manages enterprise learning budgets up to $13.8 million annually and has active learning and workplace technology initiatives. Learning leaders from corporate enterprise, government agencies, higher education and non-profit organizations will be attending ELC15.

Who Should Attend
Executives charged with driving enterprise performance via learning and workplace technologies, including HR, Talent, Development, Training, E-learning, Project Management, Education, Sales & Service should attend ELC15. Government, non-profit agencies and educational institution leaders are also in attendance to collaborate on the now and the next in learning. Attend the exclusive learning and workplace technology event hosted in the DC area in 2015, and meet colleagues from across the globe.

About Enterprise Learning! Conference
Enterprise Learning! Conference 2015 (ELC15) hosts the exclusive Learning & Workplace Technology Conference for corporate, government and higher education executives. In partnership with the Department of Defense's Defense Acquisition University (DAU) and George Mason University (GMU), ELC15 co-hosts the 'Innovations in E-learning Symposium' within the Conference. Together, ELC15 provides executives a collegiate environment to network, share and learn from leaders across all sectors. In addition, ELC15 hosts the 2015 Learning! 100 Award honoring the top global learning organizations. Past winners include Khan Academy, MIT Media Lab, Salesforce.com, Verizon, NASCAR and PGA of America. Senior level executives from the 2015 Learning! 100 are in attendance and often present at ELC15.

About Defense Acquisition University
Defense Acquisition University is an award winning corporate university for the 150,000 members of the Defense Acquisition Workforce. DAU uses classroom and Web-based training and certification programs to keep all acquisition workforce members abreast with the latest trends, developments, resources, and information available for the acquisition community. While DAU faculty use a variety of proven teaching techniques to impart information to students, including both lecture and case-based curriculum, they are also on the forefront of innovative teaching techniques such as flipped classroom and distance-learning via Telepresence suites to reach remotely located workforce members while maintaining a low per-student cost. DAU faculty not only provide the certification training that qualified acquisition professionals need now, but continuously develop the body of acquisition knowledge to meet future learning requirements. Learn more at: www.dau.mil

About George Mason University
George Mason University is Virginia's largest public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls more than 33,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the past half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity, and commitment to accessibility. Mason is setting the gold standard for the modern, public university. Its dynamic culture and innovative academic programs prepare Mason's hard-working students for 21st century careers. Its commitment to teaching excellence combines with cutting-edge research that enriches the academic experience and is literally changing the world. Mason is also one of the best values in higher education, producing graduates who lead all Virginia schools with the highest annual salaries. Learn more at: www.gmu.edu

About Elearning! Media Group
Elearning! Media Group is owned by B2B Media Group LLC. Elearning! Media Group consists of eleven media products including: Elearning! Magazine, Government Elearning! E-Magazine, e-mail newsletters, Alerts, Websites, Web seminars, the Enterprise Learning! Summit and Enterprise Learning! Conference. Elearning! Media Group serves the $220 billion learning & workplace technology market. Suppliers and practitioners can follow us: online at www.2elearning.com; on Twitter: 2elearning or #ELSummit; via Facebook: Elearning!-Magazine or LinkedIn: Elearning! Magazine Network or Elearning! Summit.

Enterprise Learning! Events
Since 2008, Enterprise Learning! Events bring onsite and online audiences together to learn, network and share. Mark your calendar for Enterprise Learning! Conference on June 8-10, 2015 in Manassas, VA. CA. Enterprise Learning! Conference hosts Innovations in E-learning Symposium, the Best of Elearning! and Learning! 100 Awards. The Enterprise Learning! Summit virtual editions are slated for July 15, and November 4, 2015. For more information about the Enterprise Learning! Conference visit http://www.elceshow.com. ##.

Published in Latest News

According to John Ambrose of Skillsoft, the ratio of learning professionals to learners is diminishing, forcing L&D departments to do more with less. Continuous learning is one way.

3 Questions...For John Ambrose, Senior Vice President, Strategy and Corporate Development, Skillsoft

 1 Recent research has indicated that L&D departments have been changing their focus in recent times.  What changes are you seeing? We've seen the ratio of learning professionals to learners diminish to the point that is less than ideal.  Doing more with less certainly hasn't excluded this multi-faceted business function. But learning professionals who offer a self-service enterprise learning program can be more strategic in their departmental mission and work toward addressing skills gaps and developing succession planning.  According to a recent Bersin by Deloitte, Deloitte Consulting LLP, Factbook, "L&D teams should build skills in performance consulting, gain expertise in new technologies including social and mobile, and work to cultivate strong learning cultures within their organizations."  Essentially, learning professionals need to be seen as contributing to the business; increasing the performance of their organization through the performance of their people.

2 How can HR professionals enable continuous learning? 

Without a doubt, a culture of continuous learning must be rooted at the very core of the organization. Without it, you'll lack optimal transfer of learning to the job, delay individual progress,
and hinder organizational innovation. When content is woven into the daily fabric of the organization, employees can get just-in-time assistance to the problems they are trying to solve. They won't have to "miss work" to get what they need, and the concepts they learn can be applied immediately. Get used to the idea that learning isn't an event; rather, learning should be infused in the day-to-day and available anywhere and everywhere employees need it. In working with other business departments, learning leaders will be able to identify skills and gaps
and be able to develop a plan to bridge the two.

3 What advice do you have for L&D professionals who want to be viewed as contributing to the success of the organization? 

First off, if you are a learning professional not devoting at least half of your budget to e-learning, you are missing huge opportunities to be more productive and more efficient. The enterprise-wide scalability is well suited for skill development and transfer. Three more pieces of advice:

1) Be prepared. Get in front of your skills gaps before they get too big to fill. Not just for the sake of continuity, but for the sake of innovation for your organization. We already know that we're going to see a big dip in numbers when baby boomers retire. Why not get ahead of that? Additionally, offer a variety of learning asset types that meet the wide range of all five generations in the workforce.

2) Take advantage of the benefits of new and emerging technology, such as mobile access. Employees are busy and on the go, so getting content into their hands when and where they need it increases the chances of learning transfer in the moment; not having to wait until they return to the desk per se. Look for ways to promote and encourage learning on the go.

3) Lastly, social is huge. It will transform the way that people learn. Flows of information and the amount of it that each employee can contribute are important. Having a forum for employees to share ideas, ask questions, be seen as experts, and be viewed as learners is an invaluable piece of the learning culture that is necessary for optimal organizational success.

—Source: "The Corporate LearningFactbook 2013: Benchmarks, Trends, and Analysis of the U.S. Training Market" by Karen O'Leonard, Deloitte Consulting LLP, January 2013.

Published in Insights
Page 10 of 172

 


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